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A poker-playing robot goes to work at the Pentagon

Lynn A. Conway Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Michael Wellman comments on the signal being sent as the Pentagon and other agencies adopt more AI technologies: the technology is maturing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

David Chesney named Collegiate Lecturer for 2018-19

Three lecturers have been honored for outstanding contributions to instruction as the 2018-19 Collegiate Lecturers, a title the three will retain throughout their careers at the university. Chesney focuses his courses around creating software for the greater good. He was instrumental in the collaboration between the College of Engineering and C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital for the formation of the MGC-FEVA Center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Education  

Recognizing a lifetime of achievement in cognitive systems

John Laird, the John L. Tishman Professor of Engineering, has been awarded the 2018 Herbert A. Simon Prize for Advances in Cognitive Systems along with his collaborator Prof. Paul Rosenbloom of the University of Southern California. This award recognizes the pairs research on cognitive architectures, especially their Soar project, their applications to knowledge-based systems and models of human cognition, and their contributions to theories of representation, reasoning, problem solving, and learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Laird, John  

Students develop games, build audiences in largest computer game course yet

The 2018 Computer Games Showcase flooded Tishman Hall with pirates, hard-hatted miners, and patriotic space war recruiters on December 11. Seniors in EECS 494, Computer Game Design and Development, and visiting students from Eastern Michigan University showed off their final group projects with live demos set up around the hall. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  Yarger, Austin  

The social justice case for computing: transforming tools for some into a language for all

As a Professor of EECS and Engineering Education Research (EER) at Michigan, Mark Guzdial is embedded with other computer science faculty to determine how different students think about computing, and just how exactly teaching it is supposed to work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Engineering Education Research  Guzdial, Mark  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Collegiate Lecturership recognizes commitment to innovative teaching

In recognition of his outstanding contributions to education, Dr. David Chesney has been named a 2018-2019 Toby Teorey Collegiate Lecturer. For many years, Chesney has encouraged his students to think in terms of social good when developing their software projects. Through his courses, students are able to learn the fundamentals of programming and software systems, while also seeing the social impact of computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Education  

The Elite Intel Team Still Fighting Meltdown and Spectre

Prof. Thomas Wenisch comments in this article on Intel's efforts to shore up the security of its microprocessors while still competing on performance. Wenisch was one of the researchers who exposed weaknesses in Intel's secure enclave technology via the Foreshadow attack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Cybersecurity  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Wenisch, Thomas  

Why Washtenaw County is home to a special "Super Smash Bros. Melee" community

CSE game development instructor Austin Yarger provides insight in this interview on why the local region has become a Smash hub. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Yarger, Austin  

Bridging the "last centimeter barrier" in electronic communications

Michigan Engineering researchers led by Prof. Pinaki Mazumder have created a new chip interconnect technology using terahertz surface-wave interconnects that will enable ultra fast data transmissions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mazumder, Pinaki  

Taking on the limits of computing power

By harnessing the power and speed of graphics processing units, a University of Michigan startup can dramatically accelerate gene sequencing, shortening tasks that took multiple days to a single hour. Ann Arbor-based Parabricks Inc. was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Phase II grant of $748,000.

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Health and Safety  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Dreslinski named Wellman Professor for outstanding research in energy efficient processors

Ron Dreslinski, assistant professor in Computer Science and Engineering, has been named a Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professor. Dreslinski works in the area of energy efficient processor architectures, a subject that has evolved from his dissertation work at Michigan. He is now working with a $9.5million DARPA grant to develop a hardware architecture and software ecosystem that together can approach the power of ASICs with the flexibility of a CPU. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Freakonomics Radio Live: Featuring Prof. Rada Mihalcea

Listen in to the new Freakonomics to catch Prof. Rada Mihalcea discuss how to increase your odds of finding out if a news article is true or fake and her piece won the episode's live audience vote! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Information Technology  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Prof. Kevin Compton, mentor and coach for CS students, retires

Prof. Kevin Compton has retired after 34 years at the University of Michigan in the Computer Science and Engineering Division of the EECS Department. Throughout his career, Prof. Compton has made contributions in service that have enhanced the student experience and the operation of the CSE Division. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Compton, Kevin  Lab-Theory of Computation  

Lynn Conway encourages graduates to embrace coming social change

Professor emerita and transgender advocate Lynn Conway delivered the 2018 Winter Commencement address to U-M graduates. Story published by The University Record. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Conway, Lynn  Diversity and Outreach  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

The web really isn't worldwide -- every country has different access

Users from certain countries cant visit certain websites not because their governments say so, but because a corporation halfway around the world has made a decision to deny them access. New article by CSE PhD student Allison McDonald at The Conversation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ensafi, Roya  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

The Malware of the Future Will Have AI Superpowers

The cybersecurity threats of deep learning and neural networks are emerging. Some learning algorithms can be fooled into making simple but crucial errors, which can lead to more malicious attacks later on. Prof. Atul Prakash and collaborators found that by sticking small black and white stickers on stop signs, they could make them undetectable to the AI algorithms used in self-driving cars. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Prakash, Atul  

Censys, a search engine for internet-connected devices, raises $2.6 million led by GV and Greylock

Cybersecurity startup Censys, co-founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, PhD candidate David Adrian, and alum Zakir Durumeric, announced that it has raised a $2.6 million seed round led by GV and Greylock. The funding will be used as Censys, which just launched as a commercial company last year, seeks to collect more data and develop additional paid services. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Halderman, J. Alex  

The Disappeared: Beyond Winning and Losing

The #MeToo movement is bringing ever-increasing awareness of the challenges faced by women in STEM. Emerita Prof. Lynn Conway drew upon her unique life-experiences in the industry, and wrote insights in an invited-essay in a Special Issue of IEEE Computer Magazine on "Winning and Losing in IT." This PDF is copyright IEEE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

Helping drivers use smart cars smarter

Profs. Jason Mars, Lingja Tang, CSE students Shih-Chieh Lin, Chang-Hong Hsu, and Yunqi Zhang, and Ford Motor Company have developed a conversational in-vehicle digital assistant that can respond to drivers questions and commands in natural language, helping them get to know the autonomous tools their cars have to offer. Their paper earned Honorable Mention Award in the Best Paper competition at this years ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Online censorship in Saudi Arabia soared after Jamal Khashoggis murder

This story highlights how tools such as Censored Planet, developed by Research Prof. Roya Ensafi, have shed light on state-sponsored censorship activities such as the measures that were put in place recently in Saudi Arabia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Ensafi, Roya  Lab-Systems  

A moral code for coders: Should ethics be part of the computer science curriculum?

This airing of Stateside on Michigan Radio includes an audio interview with Bernard A. Galler Professor of EECS HV Jagadish on the moral questions companies should ask when working with private information, and how best to incorporate ethics into coding and computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Systems  

Symposium celebrates 30 years of Artificial Intelligence at Michigan

The Michigan AI Lab celebrated 30 years of leading research with its first annual AI Symposium, AI for Society. The event welcomed 250 participants from U-M and around the country for a day of presentations, panel discussions, and poster sessions and featured U-M alumnus and Google VP Scott Huffman as the keynote speaker. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Trolley Folly

A favorite debate around self-driving vehicles is the trolley problem: a self-driving vehicle finds itself in a pickle and must choose between two terrible outcomes. See what Prof. Edwin Olson has to say on this much talked-about conundrum in his new article on Medium. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Using drones, a new software tool can bring LTE networks anywhere

Prof. Z. Morley Mao and alumnus Mehrdad Moradi (PhD CSE 2018) earned a best paper award at this year's ACM MobiCom for their work on SkyCore, a reliable new way to deploy LTE networks using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The paper, SkyCore: Moving Core to the Edge for Untethered and Reliable UAV-based LTE networks, demonstrated a way to connect hotspots on drones with commercial networks and smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  

Toyota funds professorship in AI at U-Michigan

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is U-M's first Toyota Professor of Artificial Intelligence. A $3 million gift from Toyota Motor Corporation endows the first named professorship in artificial intelligence at the University of Michigan and provides additional funding to support AI and robotics faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Graduate student honors competition highlights outstanding research

CSE held its fifteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 7, 2018. The competition is the culmination of a process that narrows a field of entrants from each of the department research areas to a handful of finalists, each of whom gives a summary presentation on an area of their research. CSE faculty and an industry sponsor from Toyota Research Institute ranked the finalists' presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Outstanding student research on display

This year, three students working with Prof. Emily Mower Provost were recognized for outstanding projects in their areas at the Graduate Symposium. Katie Matton and Matt Perez won two of the Emerging Research categories, Engineering Innovation and Science Communication, respectively; and John Gideon earned honorable mention for the Richard and Eleanor Towner Prize for Outstanding Ph.D. Research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Here's how an AI lie detector can tell when you're fibbing

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has worked on deception detection for about a decade. Popular Science looks at how she constructed one AI deception detector, and how it works. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Precision Health Award for measuring moods

Prof. Emily Mower Provost and collaborators on the Prechter Bipolar Research team were one of 10 recipients of the Michigan Precision Health Investigators Award. The awards includes grants of up to $300,000 each over two years, and awardees were chosen from among an initial pool of more than 100 applicants with significant research projects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  

A look at the election security charges in Georgias governors race

An already tight governors race in Georgia devolved into new chaos Monday after the Republican candidate, who is also the states chief election official, alleged with little evidence that Democrats sought to hack a voter database that will be used in Tuesdays elections. CSE PhD student Matthew Bernhard told the AP that anyone with access to an individual voters personal information could alter that voters record in the system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The internet security company Dug Song is betting on

UM spinoff Censys, co-founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, PhD candidate David Adrian, and alum Zakir Durumeric, monitors all devices connected to the internet for threats. IT staff at companies can use Censys to discover new threats and assess their possible impact. The company attracted early attention from Duo Security's Dug Song, and plans to begin raising a much larger Series A round later in 2019 or in 2020. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Parabricks finds a niche to target its computing power

Parabricks LLC, a 2015 spinoff from the University of Michigan that signed an exclusive licensing agreement with the school last year, was co-founded by Prof. Scott Mahlke. In October, Parabricks was awarded a National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Phase II grant of $748,000, which came with a matching grant of $125,000 from the Michigan Emerging Technologies Fund. That followed an NSF SBIR Phase I grant of $225,000 in 2017, which had a matching state grant of $25,000. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Q&A | Dont kid yourself, U.S. enemies are trying to hack our elections

As a national expert on election system security, Prof. J. Alex Halderman has never shied away from explaining how Americas election systems can and have been hacked. The University of Michigan computer science professor stops short of saying vote counts have been changed, but notes Russians tapped into voter registration lists in some states in 2016, and that he and fellow election-hack experts have demonstrated how state election systems can be infiltrated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

J. Alex Halderman on Election Systems and Vulnerabilities

C-SPAN Prof. J. Alex Halderman talked on C-SPAN about voting machine security and vulnerabilities in US election systems. He took questions from live callers and online viewers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

403 Forbidden Study reveals new data on region-specific website blocking practices

New work led by Prof. Roya Ensafi and PhD student Allison McDonald undertook the first wide-scale measurement study of server-side geographic restrictions, or geoblocking, a phenomenon in which websites block access for users in particular countries or regions, a phenomenon on the rise causing Internet balkanization. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ensafi, Roya  Graduate Students  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

Understanding at every level

From quantum physics to computer systems: a profile of Pinaki Mazumder, professor of electrical engineering and computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mazumder, Pinaki  

A secure future for US elections starts in the classroom

Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been at the forefront of exposing vulnerabilities in electronic voting systems around the world. This Fall, Prof. Halderman and CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard are teaching a new special topics course on election cybersecurity, providing students with a deep examination of the past, present, and future of US elections with perspectives from computer security, tech policy, human factors, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  Undergraduate Students  

Ahead of important elections, U.S. voting system is still vulnerable to hacking

This CBC Radio Q&A with Prof. J. Alex Halderman focuses on vulnerabilities that exist in the US voting system, as well as telephone voting in Canada and the US. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

All CSE News for 2019