Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down by Prof. Jay Guo, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. It could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

A Q&A with Alumnus Angela Blanton: VP and CFO at Carnegie Mellon University

Angela Blanton (BSE EE 1993) was recently named vice president for Finance and chief financial officer for Carnegie Mellon University. After graduating from U-M, she worked at Delphi and Chrysler Motors Corp. as an electrical engineer. She then returned to academia to earn her MBA from the Tepper School of Busines at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We asked her a few questions about her career. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

A small team may have just cracked one of the big obstacles facing smart glasses

ECE alumni startup Avegant may have just beat the billion-dollar startup Magic Leap to the first public demonstration of technology that integrates graphics with the real world with depth, so your eyes can focus on virtual objects at different distances. Co-founded by Ed Tang (CTO) and Allan Evans, Avegant first gained fame with their Glyph technology, an all-in-one personal theater. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Virtual Reality  

It's Possible to Hack a Phone With Sound Waves, Researchers Show

This article features work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators in which they demonstrate a way to take control of or influence devices such as smartphones through the use of sound waves. The Department of Homeland Security is expected to issue a security advisory alert for affected chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

A Q&A with Ann Stals Getting Down to the Details

Students, alumni, and faculty alike have something to thank Ann Stals for. As ECEs event planner, she has her hands in nearly everything the division does. Hired in August of 2014, her three years has been spent expanding ECEs outreach to students of different cultures, planning alumni meetups around the country, developing camps for high school students, and, most recently, sending current students to local and Silicon Valley companies for an insider look at an engineering workday. [Full Story]

A Q&A with Tomas Mauricio Giving Back

Tomas Mauricio spends a lot of time behind the scenes, but when he steps out front this intern makes a big impression. Helping coordinate events like ECE's Electrify tech camps and the recent ECE Expeditions, participants always remember their cheerful guide. Now he has a year with the division behind him, and Tomas looks forward to working on at least one more round of Electrify this summer. Learn more about Tomas and the varied work he does to help ECE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Students Take an ECE Expedition to Silicon Valley

ECE brought 18 students to San Jose on Sunday, February 26 for the second ECE Expedition. The students, ranging from freshman to doctoral level, spent three days of their spring break learning from professionals in their field and getting a firsthand look at where their degree could take them after graduation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Entrepreneurship  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Optical Magnetism: Photons induce high levels of magnetism in optical materials

Prof. Steve Rand's group at the MURI Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO) have both observed and explained the presence of photon-induced magnetic dipole (MD) scattering (optical magnetism) in certain crystalline materials that is just as intense as ordinary Rayleigh scattering. The experiments show for the first time an alternative way of controlling magnetic properties of materials with light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Metamaterials  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

SSCS Distinguished Lecturer Edith Beigne on Auto-adaptive digital circuits

Dr. Edith Beign presented the talk Auto-adaptive digital circuits Application to low-power Multicores and ultra-low-power Wireless Sensor Nodes to members of the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory. Dr. Beign came to Michigan as a 2016-17 Distinguished Lecturer under the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society (SSCS) Distinguished Lecturer Program. This program features researchers who are known for the quality and quantity of their research, and are considered to be excellent speakers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Afshari, Ehsan  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Cindy Finelli: Community Building And Envisioning The Future Of Engineering Education Research

Prof. Cindy Finelli was highlighted as a pioneer of engineering education for her work in community building and education research. She is part of a new initiative at U-M to include education research in engineering departments. She is also the Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

ECE Graduate Student Nathan Sawicki Recognized for Outstanding Teaching

Nathan Sawicki received a 2017 CoE Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors. Nate assisted with EECS 216 (Signals and Systems) and EECS 351 (Intro to Digital Signal Processing). He said he was inspired to be a great GSI because he himself had benefited from two award winning GSIs, and knew what a difference they could make in a student's understanding of the material. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Herb Winful Professor of Optics, Friend of the Arts

In a new interview, Prof. Herb Winful discusses the many facets of his career as an educator and researcher. Prof. Winful has made fundamental contributions to nonlinear fiber optics and nonlinear optics in periodic structures. He also discussed the interdisciplinary course he helped create, UARTS 250: Creative Process, and the creative challenges of teaching engineering principles to students of the arts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Optics and Photonics  Student Teams and Organizations  Winful, Herbert  

Azadeh Ansari Receives ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for Research in GaN-based Electro-acoustic Devices

Dr. Azadeh Ansari received a 2017 ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for her dissertation, GaN Integrated Microsystems for RF Applications. This award recognizes exceptional dissertations of outstanding scholarly quality in any field of study. The focus of her dissertation was the design, fabrication, and characterization of novel and advanced electro-acoustic devices and integrated micro/nano systems based on Gallium Nitride (GaN). GaN is the material that led to the development of new high-efficiency lighting and was the focus of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2014. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Optoelectronics  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Gopal Nataraj Receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to Support High-impact Research in Medical Imaging

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research that promises to lead to improved techniqes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program whose research is unusually creative, ambitious and impactful. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Michigan's Millimeter-Scale Computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester presented a total of 10 papers at the 2017 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). Most were related to their Michigan Micro Mote (M3) computers. Their goal is to make smarter, smaller sensors for medical devices and the Internet of Things that can do more with less energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Snow science in action

Using high-tech equipment like infrared sensors and low-tech gear like shovels, researchers are trying to determine what remote sensors could best be used on satellites to produce more accurate snowpack measurements around the world. ECE grad student Mohammad Mousavi is working on Grand Mesa with a University of Michigan boom truck parked at the Jumbo Campground by Mesa Lakes and outfitted with a microwave radiometer, one type of snowpack measurement device. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

CASSIE: A Tougher, Lighter Bipedal Robot with Eyes

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

VIDEO: U-M to begin experimenting with bird-inspired robot

The University of Michigan will begin experimenting with the capabilities of a robot inspired by a flightless bird. With two legs, backward facing knee-like joints and a short torso, researchers note that it may remind people a bit of an ostrich. Named CASSIE, the robot comes from Agility Robotics, a startup spun out of Oregon State University. U-M is one of the first organizations to begin testing out CASSIE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Memristor Research Highlights Neuromorphic Device Future

Professor Wei Lu is leading an effort to make neuromorphic processor technology a reality. Lus group is focusing on the memristors a two-terminal device that essentially is a resistor with memory that retain its stored data even when turned off that can act like synapses to build computers that can act like the human brain and drive machine learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Brain  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous 'bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Alum Michelle Stock Elected SPIE Fellow for Development of the Photonics Industry

ECE alumna Dr. Michelle Stock (BSE MSE PhD EE 88 90 94) been elected Fellow of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, "for achievements in business development and science policy for the photonics industry." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Optics and Photonics  

Prof. Zetian Mi Elected SPIE Fellow for Contributions to Photonic Devices and Artificial Photosynthesis

Prof. Zetian Mi has been elected Fellow of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics "for contributions to the development of high performance III-nitride nanowire photonic devices, including electrically injected deep UV lasers, full color nanowire LEDs, and high efficiency artificial photosynthesis." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mi, Zetian  Optics and Photonics  

Innovation is for Finishers

Many researchers are hoping startups will help get their ideas to the marketplace and universities are trying to help. Prof. Stephen Forrest, himself the founder of multiple companies, has helped colleagues get their own projects off the ground through his support for the Michigan Venture Center. Former CSE chair Farnam Jahanian also shares experiences with his founding of Arbor Networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  Forrest, Stephen  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Optics and Photonics  

Michigan has video game heaven thanks to ECE alum David Carter

David Carter (BSE EE ) serves as a reference services librarian and archivist for the U-M Computer and Video Game Archive. The CVGA features over 7,000 titles everything from time-honored favorites such as Pac-Man and Frogger to newer fare, including Call of Duty and Halo on dozens of gaming systems. Carter was previously was a lecturer at Michigans School of Information and is trained as an electrical engineer, specializing in optics and radio waves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Game Design and Development  

Tea beyond the cup

Young Mountain Tea, Fulbright scholar, and ECE alum Adhiraj Vable's (BSE EE ) start-up in Oregon works to create sustainable livelihoods for rural communities in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Sustainability  

A Q&A with Rhonda Franklin Connecting Diverse Students

ECE alumnus Rhonda Franklin uses her influence as a faculty member at the University of Minnesota to attract a diverse student population to the STEM field, and her own field of applied electromagnetics. She believes the best research results are achieved from a diversity of backgrounds, something she learned as a graduate student at Michigan and fosters in her own research group at Minnesota. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Diversity and Outreach  MEMS and Microsystems  

Alfred O. Hero Receives CoE Stephen S. Attwood Award

Al Hero, John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor and R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, received the 2016-2017 Stephen S. Attwood Award, which is the highest honor awarded to a faculty member by the College of Engineering. It recognizes "extraordinary achievement in teaching, research, service, and other activities that have brought distinction to the College and University." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  

Wei Lu Receives CoE David E. Liddle Research Excellence Award

Prof. Wei Lu received the 2016-2017 David E. Liddle Research Excellence Award from the College of Engineering for his contributions to computing systems with his memristors, neuromorphic circuits, and RRAM.Prof. Lu is an internationally recognized leader in the development of memristors for memory and logic applications. He has also developed nanowire transistors suitable for flexible electronics and optoelectornics, and conducts research into other emerging electrical devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  

Mingyan Liu Receives CoE Monroe-Brown Foundation Service Excellence Award

Prof. Mingyan Liu received the 2016-2017 Monroe-Brown Foundation Service Excellence Award from the College of Engineering for her significant and impactful service contributions in the academic and professional community, particularly in the recruitment and retention of female students and faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  

David C. Munson Jr. named president of Rochester Institute of Technology

David C. Munson Jr. was named president of Rochester Institute of Technology. Munson joined Michigan in 2003 to become Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He immediately made an impact on student relations and undergraduate education, supporting the interaction between the arts and engineering, and on the lighter side, giving us three years of memorable Halloween costumes. His forward-thinking vision for the future of engineering was recognized by the University when he was named Dean of the College of Engineering in 2006, a position he held for 10 years. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Munson Jr., David C.  

2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Marcus Darden, Almantas Galvanauskas, Atul Prakash, and Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Darden, Marcus  Galvanauskas, Almantas  Prakash, Atul  Yoon, Euisik  

Sensors from Head to Toe Todd Coleman Makes Measuring Health Simpler

Prof. Todd Coleman (BSE CE, EE ) thinks theres a way on the horizon for patients in need of regular monitoring to get out of their hospital beds. His group at the University of California San Diego is tackling the challenging problem of getting high-fidelity monitoring to work affordably at home. To answer this need, he and his group have created sensors as thin as skin that can gather data from nearly anywhere. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Flexible electronics  Health  Sensors  Winful, Herbert  

Becky Peterson Receives NSF CAREER Award for Research in Amorphous Semiconductors for Next Generation Electronics

Prof. Becky Peterson was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project entitled Band Engineering in Amorphous Semiconductors." She will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices. This research is applicable to the next generation of high-power electronics and deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, with specific applications in renewable energy and health care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optoelectronics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

LNF User Symposium - Sharing Ideas and Celebrating Innovation

The 2016 Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF) User Symposium highlighted the cutting-edge research enabled by Michigan's world-class facility. The Symposium included technical talks, a poster session, and the opportunity for discussion and networking. Four ECE grad students won prizes for their posters, and Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the event's keynote address. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Kushner, Mark J.  LNF  Plasma Science and Engineering   

Kamal Sarabandi | Remote Sensing Science and Technology

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi delivered a Geoscience Remote Sensing Seminar, titled "Remote Sensing Science and Technology in Support of Exploration and Safe Utilization of Energy Resources." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mark Kushner | The Role of Plasma Modeling

Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the Keynote Address at the 2016 LNF Users Symposium, titled The Role of Plasma Modeling in the Innovation Cycle for Nanofabrication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

New Courses Offered by ECE: Winter 2017

As technology changes and advances, so does the range of courses offered by our faculty. The following courses being offered to students for the Winter 2017 term include completely new courses as well as nearly-new courses that may soon become a regular part of the curriculum. They are all being offered by faculty uniquely qualified to teach the courses. The faculty bring extensive experience based on their own research in these areas. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Berenson, Dmitry  Course  Forrest, Stephen  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Grbic, Anthony  Hiskens, Ian  Islam, Mohammed  Kira, Mackillo  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  Revzen, Shai  Scott, Clayton D.  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

EE Student Noah Mitchell-Ward Earns PES Scholarship to Support Studies in Renewable Power

Noah Mitchell-Ward, undergraduate electrical engineering student, has been named a future power and energy leader by the IEEE Power & Energy Society, which recently awarded him a Power & Energy Society (PES) Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. This $2000 scholarship recognizes outstanding students committed to exploring the power and energy field. Noah is interested in renewable energy sources, and hopes to work with solar or wind generation and battery energy storage. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Undergraduate Students  

EE Student Leonard Kapiloff Earns PES Scholarship to Support Studies in Secure, Sustainable Grid

Leonard Kapiloff, undergraduate electrical engineering student, has been named a future power and energy leader by the IEEE Power & Energy Society, which recently awarded him a Power and Energy Society (PES) Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. This $2000 scholarship recognizes outstanding students committed to exploring the power and energy field. Leonard is also earning a minor in Energy Science and Policy. Leonard wants to work in the energy industry towards a more sustainable and secure electric grid. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Undergraduate Students  

EE Student Arun Nagpal develops new ENG 100 section to spotlight space science

For incoming freshman, Engineering (ENGR) 100 provides an initial glimpse into the world of collegiate engineering design. Starting this upcoming winter semester, a new ENGR 100 section will be implemented that spotlights previously under-represented topics: atmospheric and space science. Arun Nagpal, electrical engineering junior and co-President of SEDS, saw an opportunity to increase freshman engagement in space research through hands-on course-work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Space technology  Undergraduate Students  

Semyon Meerkov Elected Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences

On October 27, 2016, Professor Meerkov was unanimously elected as a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences for his contributions to Systems Science and Automation. The Academy, established in 1774, is the highest scientific institution in Russia. His current work is centered on production systems engineering, quasilinear control, and on the theory of resilient monitoring and control systems, which degrade gracefully under cyber-attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Meerkov, Semyon M.  

Congratulations New ECE PhDs: 2015-2016

Electrical and Computer Engineering conferred 45 PhD degrees in the Fall 2015, Summer 2016, and Winter 2016 semesters. Congrats to all of our outstanding new graduates! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  

Winter 2017: Theory and Practice of Data Compression

Course No.: EECS 553
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: David Neuhoff
Prerequisites: EECS 501, Probability and Random Processes

Course Description:
Data compression (also called source coding) is the process of creating binary representations of data from sources such as speech, images, audio, video or text. This course gives a broad introduction to the theory and practice of lossy compression, where perfect reproductions are not possible or require too many bits (for example for speech, images, audio, video), and some introduction to lossless compression, where perfect reproductions are required (for example for text or other discrete data). Particular attention is paid to compressing images, speech and video.

The lossy compression methods include a number of quantization techniques: scalar, vector, predictive (e.g. DPCM), transform (e.g., JPEG, MPEG, H.26X), subband (e.g., MP3, wavelet, JPEG2000), predictive and adaptive quantizers (e.g., CELP as used in cell phones to compress speech). The theory is mainly high-resolution quantization theory.

The lossless compression methods include Huffman, conditional, run-length, Lempel-Ziv, and arithmetic codes. The theory is entropy theory.

Students gain experience in data compression via a term project.

The course is oriented toward first and second year graduate students. No previous introduction to data compression is presumed. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Channel Coding Theory and Applications

Course No.: EECS 650
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Hessam Mahdavifar
Prerequisites: (Advisory) EECS 501 and MATH 419

Course Description:
Coding theory is the science of the systematic study of structured sets called codes, providing reliable communications and data storage in noisy environments. Today, error-correcting codes are among the fundamental parts of any communication system and data storage system.

The classical approach to construct such structured sets has been to consider certain algebraic objects such as vector spaces and finite fields. In the first part of this course, we cover some required background to study linear binary block codes and algebraic codes over finite fields. In particular, some of the well-known classical codes such as Reed-Solomon codes and BCH codes are studied.

Another approach to construct structured sets or codes has been to exploit properties of certain graphical models and trellises. This approach was essentially born by the invention of convolutional codes in 50s but was mostly discarded till 90s due to the lack of computational power. The invention of turbo codes and the re-discovery of low-density parity-check codes in 90s led to the birth of a new subfield of coding theory called modern coding theory. In the second part of the course, we study some essential aspects of modern coding theory.

A classical goal of information theory set by Shannon 70 years ago has been to construct explicit codes with practical encoder and decoder that achieve the fundamental limit of channel capacity. This goal was finally accomplished by the invention of polar codes in 2009. This has revolutionized the field of coding and information theory as many open problems have been solved using polar codes and the new notion of channel polarization. Besides being asymptotically optimal, polar codes have also been shown to perform very well at short block length which has led to their adoption in 5G wireless communication systems. In the third part of the course, we study polar codes and channel polarization together with practical aspects of their implementation. [More Info]

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway has been elected Fellow of the American Assocation for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are recognized for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Prof. Conway has made groundbreaking and fundamental contributions to Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design and production of integrated circuits. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

Kamal Sarabandi Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, has been elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are recognized for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Kamal Sarabandi's contributions have shaped the remote sensing radar imaging field for over the past quarter century. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

ECE Team Receives Distinguished Diversity Leaders Team Award

A seven member team from Electrical and Computer Engineering has received the Distinguished Diversity Leaders Team Award, established to shine a light on those staff members who have shown extraordinary commitment and dedication to diversity at U-M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Inspiring a New Generation of Women Engineers in Liberia

Six women engineering students from Liberia traveled to the U.S. to attend the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Women in Engineering 2016 conference, under the sponsorship of the Excellence in Higher Education for Liberian Development (EHELD) program and U-M-SWE. They spoke of their passion to improve their country through engineering, as well as the difficulties of being female engineers in their country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Winful, Herbert  

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

The Office of Naval Research has awarded Prof. Dmitry Berenson $1.1 million to help advance a robot's ability to walk over unstable ground and deal with tangles in string, rope or wire. One of the new abilities that Berenson and his group will help robots attain is navigating unfamiliar environments by reusing previous experience from similar environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Stephen Forrest Receives IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal for Pioneering Work in OLEDs

Stephen Forrest, Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, is the co-recipient of the 2017IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal, along with Ching W. Tang and Mark Thompson, For their pioneering work on organic devices, leading to organic light-emitting diode displays. The Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal is given for outstanding contributions to material and device science and technology, including practical application. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

All ECE News for 2017