Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS News

Dmitry Berenson Helps Robots Play Nice with People (with Video)

Prof. Dmitry Berenson wants robots to help us out anywhere, any time. In order to do so, he's working with state of the art equipment to design algorithms for robotic manipulation. These algorithms could turn a hunk of metal into a useful household assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Breakthrough for Large Scale Computing: Memory Disaggregation Made Practical

CSE researchers have introduced Infiniswap, the first system to scalably implement cluster-wide memory disaggregation, whereby the memory of all the servers in a computing cluster is transparently exposed as a single memory pool to all the applications in the cluster. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Shin, Kang G.  Software Systems  

New Computer Chips That See Data Will Enable Energy-Efficient Supercomputers

Drawing inspiration from how mammalian brains process sight, Prof. Wei Lu has found a way to mimic the functions of biological neural networks on a next-gen memristor chip. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Neuromorphic Chips Offer Neural Networks That Actually Work Like the Brain

Engineers at the University of Michigan are onto something rather more brainlike, however, with help from a peculiar electrical component known as a memristor. They've developed a new "sparse coding" algorithm that uses grids of memristors to approximate the pattern recognition abilities of mammalian brains. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Alum Dennis Grimard Delivers Commencement Address at Vermont Tech Graduation

Dennis Grimard (MSE PhD EE 1984 1990), a Barre, Vt., native, contributed greatly to the construction of U-M's Lurie Nanofabrication Facility, and now works as the associate director of MIT's nanofabrication lab, MIT.nano. During his address, Dennis choked up as he described his background. He came from a line of farmers, quarry workers and small-business owners who were "always willing to give more than they take," he said. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Next-gen computing inspired by biology

Inspired by how mammals see, a new memristor computer circuit prototype developed by Prof. Wei Lu has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude faster and with much less power than todays most advanced systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Lifelong Radiation Lab Researcher Valdis Liepa Retires

Dr. Valdis V. Liepa, research scientist in ECE, retired from active faculty status on January 31, 2017. Dr. Liepa has been a member of the U-M family for his entire career, earning his BS , MS, and PhD in EE (1958, 1959, and 1966, respectively), and joining the Radiation Laboratory in 1968. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Won Pyo Hong, President of Samsung SDS, Presented with Inaugural ECE Alumni Impact Award

Dr. Won Pyo Hong (MSE PhD EE ), President of Samsung SDS, was presented the first annual ECE Alumni Impact Award. This honor, established in 2017, recognizes Dr. Hong for his pioneering work in the personal electronics industry, playing a key role in shaping our world. It is the highest recognition granted by ECE to its alumni. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  

CSE Receives NCWIT Award for Recruiting and Retention Efforts of Women in Computing

The Computer Science and Engineering Division has received a NCWIT Extension Services Transformation (NEXT) Award for excellence in promoting women in undergraduate computing. Sponsored by the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) and Google, the NEXT Awards honor academic departments that show significant positive outcomes in increasing womens meaningful participation in computing education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Brian Noble Named Chair of Computer Science and Engineering

Influential educator and computer scientist Brian Noble has been selected as the new chair of the Computer Science and Engineering division of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Noble, Brian  

U.S. Hospitals Not Immune to Crippling Cyber Attacks

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu comments on the vulnerabilities that exist in hospital and healthcare systems and devices. The recent strike by the ransomware program called WannaCry demonstrates that these shortcomings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

Apple Just Acquired This Little-Known Artificial Intelligence Startup

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  

Apple acquires AI company Lattice Data, a specialist in unstructured dark data, for $200M

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  

Smartphone security hole: "Open port" backdoors are common

The College of Engineering reports on work by computer science security researchers which has revealed that so-called "open ports" are much more vulnerable to security breaches than previously thought. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Picting, not Writing, is the Literacy of Todays Youth

This blog post by Thurnau Prof. Elliot Soloway and his collaborator Cathie Norris looks at the disconnect between existing instructional materials (90% text) and how K-12 students communicate and consume (90% image-based), with ramifications for educational practices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Babak Parviz One of 20 Alumni Honored with U-M Bicentennial Award

The University of Michigan presented alumnus Babak Parviz (MSE PhD EE 97 01; also MS Physics 97) with a Bicentennial Alumni Award for his pioneering technological innovations that augment human potential and improve peoples lives. Babak is one of 20 alumni to earn this exclusive award, and one of 10 to accept it at the spring commencement ceremony. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Sister cell profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan including Prof. Euisik Yoon developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Yoon, Euisik  

Shai Revzen part of a new five-institution MURI focused on the control of dynamic systems

Prof. Shai Revzen is a member of a five-institution team that will take advantage of recent advances in computation to exploit the promise of the Koopman Theory for modeling and control of dynamic systems.

The research is funded under a $6.25 million, five-year Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI) based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and called From Data-Driven Operator Theoretic Schemes to Prediction, Inference and Control of Systems (DDOTS to PICS). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

2017 ISCA Influential Paper Award for Groundbreaking Research in Power-efficient Computing

For their groundbreaking research in power-efficient computing, faculty and former students of the department received the 2017 ACM SIGARCH and IEEE-CS TCCA ISCA Influential Paper Award. The researchers developed a method to intelligently put parts of a computer's memory into a low power mode to save energy. Since 2002, the technique has been adopted by major chip manufacturers, and has continued to be exploited in subsequent research by the authors themselves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Mudge, Trevor  

Wellman and Rajan on the Ethics of Automated Trading

In this audio interview at Algocracy and the Transhumanist Project, Prof. Michael Wellman and Business Administration Prof. Uday Rajan comment on the ethics of autonomous trading agents on financial markets. The discussion encompasses algorithmic trading, high frequency trading, market manipulation, the AI control problem, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

U-M Optics Researchers Sponsor Optics and Photonics Industry Snapshot

Professionals and researchers from across Michigan's optics industry gathered for the Optics and Photonics Industry Snapshot on March 27, celebrating both the Optical Society of America's 100th anniversary and the Ann Arbor chapter's 50th. The event was sponsored in part by the Optical Society at the University of Michigan (OSUM), advised by research scientist John Nees. Prof. Aghapi Mordovanakis (BME) was also part of the planning of the event. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Nees, John A.  Optics and Photonics  

Thomas B. A. Senior Named Fellow of International Union of Radio Science

Professor Emeritus Thomas B. Senior, known internationally for his work in scattering and electromagnetics, has been named a fellow of the International Union of Radio Science. The URSI coordinates international exchange and study of all aspects of electromagnetic fields and waves, and fellowship is by invitation only. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Senior, Thomas B. A.   

Hundreds of popular Android apps have open ports, making them prime targets for hacking

This article reports on the work done by CSE researchers Yunhan Jack Jia, Qi Alfred Chen, Yikai Lin, Chao Kong, and Prof. Z. Morley Mao in characterizing a widespread vulnerability in popular Android apps. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Rackham Student Spotlight: Elizabeth Dreyer

Liz is a Rackham Merit Fellow and has always been intentional about her status as a first generation college student, wanting to find whatever ways to increase her chance for success as much as possible. Liz examines magneto-electric scattering, shining high-powered lasers and controlling input light to focus on the scattered light and determine whats happening to the material, particularly exploring what makes one material better than another. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Students in EECS 556 Win Prizes for Improving Image Processing Techniques for Camera Motion Blur and Facial Recognition

Two teams earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of KLA-Tencor. The course, taught this past term by Prof. Boklye Kim (Radiology, EECS), covers topics in the theory of multidimensional signal analysis and processing with applications in optical, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance images. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Undergraduate Students  

Open Ports Create Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

This article reports on work by CSE researchers who have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data by using open ports to create backdoors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking with Sound Waves

CSE researchers have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones and self-driving cars. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An Obscure Flaw Creates Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

CSE researchers have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Gopal Nataraj Earns Best Paper Award for Improving MRI

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in ECE, earned a Best Student Paper award at the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging for his paper "Dictionary-Free MRI Parameter Estimation Via Kernel Ridge Regression." Gopal is working to improve the sensitivity of MRIs to specific disorders as well as improving doctors' ability to distinguish closely-related disorders. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Health  Lab-Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Student teams earn prizes for analog-digital converter circuit designs in EECS 511

Students in the graduate level course, Integrated Analog/Digital Interface Circuits (EECS 511), taught by Prof. Michael Flynn, competed for cash prizes while presenting their final design projects thanks to the support of Analog Devices, Inc. Two winning projects and teams were determined by an expert panel at Analog Devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Flynn, Michael  Graduate Students  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Prof. Andy Yagle Retires After a 32-Year Career in Signal and Image Processing

Prof. Andy Yagle will retire in May after 32 years at the University of Michigan distinguished by his dedication to teaching as well as contributions to research in the area of signal and image processing. A nearly lifelong Ann Arbor resident, Andy is as Maize and Blue as they come. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Yagle, Andrew E.  

Heath Hofmann Recognized for Excellence in Teaching with the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Award from the College of Engineering

Prof. Heath Hofmann was honored to receive the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Award for Excellence in Teaching. This award, previously limited to faculty in other departments, was opened up to the entire College of Engineering faculty for the first time. Prof. Hofmann specializes in power electronics and electromechanical energy conversion. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Hofmann, Heath  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Power and Energy  

Award-Winning Graduate Student Instructors & Instructional Aides

To celebrate the contributions of our graduate and undergraduate instructors, the department selects the best of the best, based on student evaluations, and celebrates them at a special awards ceremony. This event occurred Wednesday, April 26, 2017, when 14 students were recognized for their skill, passion, and care for the students they were charged to assist during the past academic year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

EECS 280 Becomes Third Largest Course at U-M

With almost 1000 students enrolled, EECS 280: Programming and Introductory Data Structures, is a core CS class that has grown in popularity. Course enrollment has increased by almost 200 students in just one year, making it the third largest course for the winter 2017 semester at U-M, and the largest course in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Mary Lou Dorf Named U-M Collegiate Lecturer

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has been selected for distinction through the U-M Collegiate Lecturer Program. She has made notable contributions to instruction through her reimagining of EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, and has also been involved in a years-long program to expand the reach of the computer science program offered through the College of LSA. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Behzad Yektakhahi Earns Paper Award for Research in Seeing Through Walls

ECE PhD student Behzad Yektakhah earned an honorable mention in the 2017 IEEE Antennas and Propagaation Society Student Paper Competition for his paper, "All Directions Through the Wall Imaging Using Omnidirectional Bi-static FMCW Transceivers." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Parag Deotare Voted HKN Professor of the Year for ECE

Prof. Parag Deotare was named the 2016-2017 HKN Professor of the Year in ECE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Deotare, Parag  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Undergraduate Students  

James Juett Voted HKN Professor of the Year for CSE

EECS students voted, and Dr. James Juett was named the 2016-2017 HKN Professor of the Year in CSE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Juett, James  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2017: Self-Driving Cars: Perception & Control

Course No.: EECS 498-009
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Matthew Johnson-Roberson
Prerequisites: Programming skills in Python & MATLAB, Some C++

Course Description:
This course will teach the theoretical underpinnings of self-driving car algorithms and the practical application of the material in hands-on labs. Highlights will include field trips to M-City, a 32-acre autonomous vehicle site on the U's North Campus, demos and rides in full size autonomous vehicles, and small group work with a competition where students test their own self-driving car algorithms. [More Info]

Mary Lou Dorf Selected for Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has been selected as a recipient of the 2017 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize, which recognizes faculty who have made use of innovation to improve student learning. She has been recognized for her work in reimagining EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Fall 2017: EECS 598-004 Laser Plasma Diagnostics

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Louise Willingale
Prerequisites: EECS 537 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
High power laser pulses are used to both create and diagnose high-energy density systems. In this course, we will discuss the techniques used for creating, characterizing and timing high power laser pulses from megajoule-nanosecond pulses to relativistic-intensity femtosecond pulses. We will explore the diagnostics used to characterize high-energy density plasmas through optical and other radiation measurements as well as backlighting techniques. Other important aspects of performing experiments, such as target positioning techniques, will be touched on. In addition to the material discussed in lectures, students will consider real experimental data and recent research publications to learn analysis techniques, gain appreciation for physical limitations (such as instrument resolution and background signals), and comparison with theoretical models. This course is suitable for graduate students studying plasma physics, optics and laser science and other related areas. [More Info]

Tony England receives Susan B. Anthony Campus Award

University of Michigan-Dearborns Commission for Women honored College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) Dean Tony England during the organizations annual Susan B. Anthony Awards Dinner on April 4. England received the Susan B. Anthony Campus Award in recognition of his longstanding commitment to the advancement of women and girls in the fields of science and engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  England, Anthony W.  

Fall 2017: VLSI for Signal Processing and Communication Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Hun-Seok Kim
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
This course will survey methodologies to design energy efficient and/or high-performance VLSI systems for the state-of-the-art image/audio processing, machine learning, and wireless communication systems. The primary focus of the course is on designing hardware efficient algorithms and energy-aware VLSI IC architectures to deliver the performance and efficiency requiredby various signal processing applications. The course will be a mix of lectures and student-led presentations/projects. The content will be suitable for senior undergraduates or graduate students interested in hardware-efficient signal processing algorithms andtheir VLSI implementations. [More Info]

MICDE Grant Funds Renewable Power Research

Prof. Johanna Mathieu is working on one of four projects in computational science that earned a Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering Catalyst Grant, an award of $75,000. Mathieu is participating in a project titled "Computational Energy Systems," which will develop new algorithms for the U.S. electrical power grid that integrate renewable energy sources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability  

Courage to Resist: The High-Stakes Adventures of J. Alex Halderman

This story by Randy Milgrom at the UM College of Engineering profiles Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his work in the area of Digital Democracy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Why India Needs A Paper Trail For Free And Fair Elections

This article in the Indian edition of the Huffington Post, references the work that Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators did in 2010 to demonstrate vulnerabilities in India's "tamper-proof" electronic voting machines. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jack Kosaian Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Recent graduate Jack Kosaian (BSE CS 16) has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering. He currently works with Professor Mosharaf Chowdhury on developing systems to mitigate load imbalance for data-intensive systems (EC-Cache, OSDI16), and to reduce communication overhead in performing analytics over geographically distributed datasets. [Full Story]

Vishal Giare Named Air, Missile Defense Mission Area Lead at Johns Hopkins APL

ECE alum Vishal Giare (MS EE:S 97), formerly a program area manager at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, has been appointed as APLs mission area executive for air and missile defense. He now leads the laboratorys efforts to develop ballistic missile defense and anti-air warfare systems for U.S. forces and allies, APL said Thursday. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Need a job? How about engineering a driverless car?

As Michigan accelerates toward leadership in the emerging driverless car technology, industry experts say its workforce needs to catch up. Gov. Rick Snyder signed legislation in December allowing the public to buy and use fully self-driving cars when they are available. Jessy Grizzle, the director of Michigan Robotics, said the problem of finding talent in self-driving cars lies in the lack of integrated capability to develop the industry. But that is also where the solution lies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Grizzle, Jessy  

EE Sophomore Takes on W8UM Amateur Radio Club Leadership

The W8UM Amateur Radio Club welcomed new leadership for the 2017-2018 shool year. Kit Ng (N9KIT), a Chicago native, will serve as president. Kit is pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering, and obtained his first amateur ham radio license in 2014. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

All EECS News for 2017