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EECS News

Reimagining how computers are designed: University of Michigan leads new $32M center

The Center for Applications Driving Architectures, or ADA, at the University of Michigan will develop a transformative, "plug-and-play" ecosystem to encourage a flood of fresh ideas in computing frontiers such as autonomous control, robotics and machine-learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

U-M startup May Mobility blazes toward autonomous fleet market

May Mobility, co-founded and led by Prof. Edwin Olson, has tested its autonomous vehicles on the streets of Downtown Detroit. The startup recently licensed five autonomous driving related technologies from U-M, and outside of the life sciences, is the most successful UM startup in raising first round of funding so quickly. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Professor Emeritus Ribbens Publishes 8th Edition of Understanding Automotive Electronics

William Ribbens, professor emeritus of electrical engineering and computer science, recently published an 8th edition of his textbook Understanding Automotive Electronics, which adds information on the latest in automotive technology, including autonomous vehicles, camera systems, hybrid control, and software networks [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  

CSE Researchers Funded to Enhance Online Communication

Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki have been awarded two grants from Trove.ai, an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup, to develop novel methods and tools that will unleash the power of online communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

New bill could finally get rid of paperless voting machines

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on the the vulnerabilities that exist in voting machines, why paper backup is a practical solution, and the approaches that should be taken in auditing election results. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Integrity of Data: Medical Device Cybersecurity Concerns

This article highlights the work Prof. Ken Fu is doing to highlight and mitigate security shortcomings in medical devices and other devices that include embedded processing systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

DARPA Takes Chip Route to "Unhackable" Computers

This article in EE Times quotes Prof. Todd Austin on his DARPA-funded MORPHEUS project, which will use computer circuits that are designed to randomly shuffle data around a computer system in order to thwart hackers who are looking for the location of a bug or valuable data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Computer Games Showcase Highlights New Games Built by CS Seniors

Tishman Hall in the Beyster Building hosted the ever-popular Computer Games Showcase, which allows attendees to wade into a CS mosh pit and play the final projects developed by computer science seniors in EECS 494, Computer Game Design and Development. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

A New Type of Computer Could Render Many Software Hacks Obsolete

This article quotes Prof. Todd Austin on his DARPA-funded MORPHEUS project, which will use computer circuits that are designed to randomly shuffle data around a computer system in order to thwart hackers who are looking for the location of a bug or valuable data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Prof. Forrest: The Future of Organic LEDs

What's the difference between organic LEDs and inorganic LEDs? Where can organic LEDs take us in the future? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  

Prof. Bhattacharya: From Glazier Way to Quantum Dot Lasers

Quantum dots are at the cusp of adoption in nanotechnogy across industries. What are they, and how did they come about? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Quantum Science and Technology  

Prof. Ken Wise: Microelectronics, MEMS, and Microsystems

Hear about the lifetime career of a professor responsible for enabling the Internet of Things," with technologies like infrared sensors, interface circuits, implantable microsystems for healthcare. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  MEMS and Microsystems  Wise, Kensall  

New quick-learning neural network powered by memristors

Prof. Wei Lu led a team in creating a new type of neural network made with memristors, which can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Unhackable Computer Under Development with $3.6M DARPA Grant

By turning computer circuits into unsolvable puzzles, a University of Michigan team aims to create an unhackable computer with a new $3.6 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Todd Austin, a professor of computer science and engineering, leads the project, called MORPHEUS. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Jenna Wiens Named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professor

Jenna Wiens, assistant professor in Computer Science and Engineering, has been named a Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professor. The professorship is awarded to junior faculty members in recognition of outstanding contributions to teaching and research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Prof. Mohammed Islam developed a small chemical sensor device that will be able to detect "single-fingerprint quantities" of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away. It could potentially be used to identify traces of drugs and explosives and speed the analysis of certain medical samples. It could also be mounted on a drone or carried by doctors, police, border officials and soldiers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  

A Case Against Net Neutrality

In this opinion piece, Prof. Harsha Madhyastha makes that point that an entirely neutral net is not necessarily an efficient net. In order for us to operate optimally, he says we need to answer the question: How can we legally define the permissible ways an ISP could throttle or prioritize traffic in a manner that does not place undue burden on ISPs, yet is verifiable by third parties? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Rethinking Transistors for the Internet of Things

The technological achievements of PsiKick, cofounded by Prof. David Wentzloff, and Ambiq Micro, cofounded by Scott Hanson (BSE MSE PhD EE), are compared to other low-voltage transistors in the competition to offer the lowest power consumption for our ubiquitous electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Wentzloff, David  

Do Robots Deserve Human Rights?

In this article, Discover reached out to experts in artificial intelligence, computer science and human rights to shed light on whether or not robots should be given human rights. Prof. Kuipers talks about why robots do not deserve the same rights as humans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

The Art of Cyber War with Isaac Porche

Isaac Porche (PhD EE:S 1998) is a senior engineer at the RAND Corporation, where he leads research to help Homeland Security and the government adopt proper cyber security tactics. In this interview, he shares the global state of cyber warfare, the threats to government computer systems, and how his time at Michigan led him to being on the frontlines of technological attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cyber-physical systems  Diversity and Outreach  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

This Researcher Is Using Brain-Mapping to Improve Anxiety and Depression Treatment for Teens

Anastasia Yendiki (PhD EE:S 2005) talks about her work mapping brain matter to help better treat anxiety and depression in teens in this profile series by InStyle magazine highlighting women "who not only have a voice but defy the irrelevant preconceptions of gender."
[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Blockchain Supply Chain's Chronicled Names ECE alumnus Gutgutia as VP

As reported by BlockTribune, blockchain-based smart supply chain solutions company called Chronicled has named Abhishek Gutgutia (MS EE 2007) as one of its new Vice Presidents of Product. Gutgutia will work with Chronicled to expand its business in the pharmaceutical and precious metals industries. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Thomas B. A. Senior (1928 - 2017): In Memoriam

Thomas B. A. Senior, professor emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, passed away peacefully November 24th at the age of 89. Professor Senior was a devoted member of the department for 41 years as an active faculty member, and another 19 as an emeritus faculty. He was known for his fundamental contributions to electromagnetic and acoustic scattering, for his signficant service and leadership to the department and professional community, and for his excellence as an educator. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Senior, Thomas B. A.   

The Two-Legged Robots Walking Into the Future

Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his students are featured in this VICE Motherboard video on bipedal robots and specifically Cassie's family. Learn about Cassie's roots at Agility Robotics, see what Cassie sees, and where bipedal robots might go in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Jordi Ribas: From Video Compression to Leading AI Products at Microsoft

Jordi Ribas (PhD EE:S 1996), Corporate Vice President of AI Products at Microsoft and an ECE Council member, describes utilizing what he learned in electrical engineering and video compression to eventually work and lead one of the largest tech companies' AI Products division. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Kevin Fu Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Embedded and Medical Device Security

Prof. Fu is an expert on the subject of creating trustworthy embedded computing systems that are resistant to attack. He has served in several national leadership roles to advise government on science, technology, and policy to improve computer security and privacy. He is a cofounder of healthcare cybersecurity startup VirtaLabs [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

An armed robber's Supreme Court case could affect all Americans digital privacy for decades to come

Prof. HV Jagadish writes in this article for The Conversation about the data privacy challenges presented by a world in which our devices continuously record and track our activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Mobile and Networked Computing  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Winter 2018: Organic Electronic Devices and Applications

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Stephen Forrest
Prerequisites: Senior level quantum mechanics, junior level electronic devices

Course Description:
Today, there is a revolution in optoelectronics: OLED displays are used in billions of smart phones, televisions, tablets and smart watches worldwide. They are now coming into use in lighting for both residential and automotive applications. Organic solar cells are achieving 15% efficiencies, bringing them to the cusp of generating a new, ultralow cost renewable energy source. Contemporaneously, the fundamental understanding of organic semiconductors used in these emerging applications has been a subject of intense study for over 70 years, and in many cases is still not fully understood. In this course, we will trace the history, science and modern applications of organic electronic technology. Since some students have taken the first course on this topic in W17, only the first few weeks of the course will provide the fundamental physics of organics primarily as a review. This will include the basics of the optical and electrical properties of organic semiconductors. Next, we will discuss how organics are deposited and patterned to achieve thin film device structures. The bulk of the class material is concerned with device physics, engineering and applications. In particular light emission from OLEDs, their various structures and adaptations for high efficiency displays and lighting will be discussed. This is followed by a treatment of organic thin film transistor physics and applications for sensing, medical applications etc. The course is concluded by a comprehensive treatment of organic solar cells: their status, efficiency limits, reliability, as an energy harvesting technology will be described.
[More Info]

Winter 2018: Control and Modeling of Power Electronics

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Al Avestruz
Prerequisites: Familiarity with classical control concepts

Course Description:
Transformative technologies in energy conversion will be smarter, faster, and more reliable. This class will address the control and modeling of acdc, dcac, and dcdc power electronic systems. Topics include smallsignal models; digital and analog control; switched, sampleddata, and averaged models; large signal considerations; distributed power conversion; computer modeling in PLECS, MATLAB/Simulink, and LTSpice; and other advanced topics. Design cases may include audio switching power amplifiers, peak power point tracking for renewables and energy scavenging, resonant converters for wireless power transfer, power factor correction, and grid connected converters among others.
[More Info]

Wei Lu Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Neuromorphic Systems

Prof. Lu is an internationally recognized leader in the development of memristors for memory and logic applications. He has also developed nanowire transistors suitable for flexible electronics and optoelectornics, and conducts research into other emerging electrical devices. Lu founded the successful company Crossbar, Inc. in 2010. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Marvell Is Buying Rival Chipmaker Cavium, Founded by ECE Alum Syed Ali, For $6 Billion

Marvell Technology is purchasing Cavium, a provider of semiconductor products founded by Syed Ali (MSE EE 1981), for $6 billion in cash and stock. Ali will serve as a strategic adviser and board member of the combined companies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Data and Computing  

University students reflect on attending COP23 Conference

Matt Irish, who is studying for masters degrees in Applied Climate Science and Electrical Engineering, attended this years 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Irish is an EDF Climate Corps Fellow & Dow Sustainability Fellow. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Sustainability  

New biodegradable hydrogel offers eco-friendly alternative to synthetics

Professor Jerzy Kanicki and an international team of collaborators have developed a new hydrogel made from natural and biodegradable materials that allows for applications in agriculture and medicine without the potential risks of synthetic hydrogels. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kanicki, Jerzy  Sustainability  

Winter 2018: Multidisciplinary Capstone Design Project - Supplemental Information

Course No.: EECS 498-006 and EECS 498-007
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Jay Guo and Hun Seok Kim
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
See attached PDF
[More Info]

Winter 2018: Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
EECS students, together with ME and MSE students, work on common, interesting, significant major design experience (MDE) projects. This pilot course is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for ECE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences.

For WN18, we expect to have several projects with application focus in biomedical, energy, spaceflight, and other areas needing EECS students (e.g. sensor/electronics, embedded systems, controls, and wireless). Please contact Prof. Gilchrist with questions.
[More Info]

Student-Built App Guides Smithsonian Gallery Visitors Through Ancient Asian Art Exhibit

Visitors to the Smithsonian's Freer|Sackler Galleries in Washington DC will be guided through an exhibit on ancient Asian art by an app developed by a team of UM students through the Multidisciplinary Design Program. The exhibit and app trace the historic pilgrimage of 8th century Korean monk Hyecho to provide context for the exhibit. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jamin, Sugih  Undergraduate Students  

HV Jagadish Elected as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

HV Jagadish, the Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a distinguished scientist at the Michigan Institute for Data Science, has been elected as a fellow of the AAAS for distinguished contributions to database systems and many aspects of Big Data and data science, specifically for new ways to share data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Beyond the threshold: Solving the leaking problem in ultra-low-power systems

Prof. David Blaauw and his team is recognized for their potential solution in providing a stable voltage to overcome a large hurdle in the design of small electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Electronic devices  

Ada Lovelace Opera and Lightning Talks Highlight Women's Contributions to Computing

A creative event designed to showcase women's contributions as computer scientists took place November 16. The Ada Lovelace Opera began with eight TED-style lightning talks by female faculty and students at UM who are engaged in cutting-edge computing research. The talks were followed by an opera on Ada Lovelace's establishment as the research partner of inventor Charles Babbage in the 1840s, which was performed by students in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Seed-sized U-M computers pumped into oil wells featured at the Houston Museum of Natural Science

A specially created version of the Michigan Micro Mote, measuring 5mmx5mm, is being featured for its role in oil exploration as part of a new exhibit at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Energy Science and Engineering  Grbic, Anthony  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

3D Printing Technology Facilitates Fabrication Of A Curved Organic Photodetector For Image Sensing Devices

Prof. Jerzy Kanicki and his team developed a new fabrication method for curved substrates using a 3D printing process. The technique will enable next-generation camera systems or artificial eyes, as well as high performance image sensing devices for breast cancer detection and other more. Read the paper in Advanced Materials Technologies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Kanicki, Jerzy  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

The Beanbag Test for Robots

Its one thing for a robot to sort through a pile of rigid objects like blocks, but what about softer stuff? Dmitry Berenson and the Autonomous Robotic Manipulation (ARM) Lab showcase their latest work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Control Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

The Million Foot View: Profile of Kamal Sarabandi

In this profile, Kamal Sarabandi describes his work as he has expanded radar capabilities in applications ranging from low earth orbit to thousands of feet underground. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Remote Sensing  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  Sarabandi, Kamal  Wireless Communications  

An afternoon with U-M Robotics' newest robot

WDIV visited Jessy Grizzle's team and Cassie, their bipedal robot, and put her in the spotlight with a live feed to Facebook. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

2017 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition Highlights Outstanding Research

CSE held its fourteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 8. The top presentation competition was "Analyzing and Enhancing the Security of Modern Memory Systems," given by Salessawi Ferede Yitbarek, who represented CSE's Hardware research area. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Prof. Chris Peikert Receives TCC Test of Time Award for Work in Lattice Cryptography

Chris Peikert, the Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor in Theoretical Computer Science, and his co-author Alon Rosen have received the TCC Test of Time Award for their paper on efficient collision-resistant hashing on cyclic lattices. The award is a recognition of a long line of works by Prof. Peikert and others who laid the foundations for practically efficient lattice-based cryptography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Winter 2018: Mining Large-scale Graph Data

Course No.: EECS 598-008
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of linear algebra, programming, and machine learning

Course Description:
Graphs naturally represent information ranging from linksbetween webpages to friendships in social networks, tocollaborations between coauthors and connections betweenneurons in our brains. These graphs often span billions of nodesand interactions between them. Within this deluge of interconnected data, how can we extract useful knowledge,understand the underlying processes, make interesting discoveries, and contribute to decision-making?

This course will cover recent methods and algorithms foranalyzing large-scale graphs, as well as applications in variousdomains (e.g., neuroscience, web science, social science,computer networks). The focus will be on scalable and practicalmethods, and students will have the chance to analyzelarge-scale datasets. The topics that we will cover includeclustering and community detection, recommendation systems,similarity analysis, deep learning, summarization, and anomalydetection in the graph setting.
[More Info]

Winter 2018: Social Computing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: EECS 485 or EECS 493 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computation rarely exists in isolation. From social media, to collaboration and coordination tools, to crowdsourcing and collective intelligence, technology has risen from use as an individual tool for focused domains to play a role in or even mediate a majority of social interactions today. Social Computing is the study of this interplay between social processes and the computation that supports and augments them. This course will cover topics including collaborative systems, social media, systems for supporting collective action, data mining and analysis, crowdsourcing, human computation, and peer production.
[More Info]

Deep UV LEDs Lead to Two Best Poster Awards at ISSLED 2017

At ISSLED 2017, PhD student David Laleyan and visiting scholar Xianhe Liu both won best student poster awards for their work showcasing new techniques for creating deep ultraviolet (UV) LEDs. The researchers work with Prof. Zetian Mi. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LEDs  Mi, Zetian  Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Prof. Reetuparna Das Inducted into the MICRO Hall of Fame

Assistant Professor Reetuparna Das has been inducted into the IEEE/ACM MICRO Hall of Fame, an honor given to outstanding researchers with eight or more papers at the International Symposium on Microarchitecture. MICRO is the flagship conference for microprocessor architecture and one of the top-tier computer architecture conferences. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

All EECS News for 2018