Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Research News

How to Build a BigANT Shai Revzen's Critter-Inspired Robots

Want to build your own robot fast and cheap? Shai Revzen is making that easier with his plate and reinforced flexure (PARF) fabrication technique. He used PARF to develop the meter-scale hexapedal robot known as BigANT, whose design files are available to all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down by Prof. Jay Guo, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. It could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Video: Tech Time - Software developed to help the blind

This news segment on WDIV TV highlights the work that Dr. David Chesney and his students have done in conjunction with India West, a passionate young woman who lost her eyesight at an early age. Together, they conceptualize and develop technology for the visually impaired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  Undergraduate Students  

Sonic Cyber Attacks Show Security Holes in Ubiquitous Sensors

Sound waves can be used to hack into critical sensors used in a broad array of technologies including smartphones, automobiles, medical devices, and the Internet of Things, according to research performed by Prof. Kevin Fu, Prof. Peter Honeyman, CSE graduate student Timothy Trippel, and their collaborators at the University of South Carolina. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Cindy Finelli: Community Building And Envisioning The Future Of Engineering Education Research

Prof. Cindy Finelli was highlighted as a pioneer of engineering education for her work in community building and education research. She is part of a new initiative at U-M to include education research in engineering departments. She is also the Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

CSE-Based Startup Clinc Receives $6.3M in Funding to Further Develop Intelligent Banking Assistant

Clinc, the cutting-edge artificial intelligence startup founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang along with CSE research fellow Michael Laurenzano and CSE graduate student Johann Hauswald, has announced it has closed a $6.3 million Series A round of financing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Technology Transfer  

Gopal Nataraj Receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to Support High-impact Research in Medical Imaging

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research that promises to lead to improved techniqes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program whose research is unusually creative, ambitious and impactful. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Michigan's Millimeter-Scale Computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester presented a total of 10 papers at the 2017 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). Most were related to their Michigan Micro Mote (M3) computers. Their goal is to make smarter, smaller sensors for medical devices and the Internet of Things that can do more with less energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Snow science in action

Using high-tech equipment like infrared sensors and low-tech gear like shovels, researchers are trying to determine what remote sensors could best be used on satellites to produce more accurate snowpack measurements around the world. ECE grad student Mohammad Mousavi is working on Grand Mesa with a University of Michigan boom truck parked at the Jumbo Campground by Mesa Lakes and outfitted with a microwave radiometer, one type of snowpack measurement device. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

CASSIE: A Tougher, Lighter Bipedal Robot with Eyes

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Harsha Madhyastha Selected for Google Faculty Award

Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha has been awarded a 2017 Google Faculty Research Award for his work in enabling the deployment of low-latency web services in the cloud. It is his third research award from Google. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Data Centers  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Software Systems  

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous 'bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Becky Peterson Receives NSF CAREER Award for Research in Amorphous Semiconductors for Next Generation Electronics

Prof. Becky Peterson was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project entitled Band Engineering in Amorphous Semiconductors." She will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices. This research is applicable to the next generation of high-power electronics and deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, with specific applications in renewable energy and health care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optoelectronics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Kamal Sarabandi | Remote Sensing Science and Technology

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi delivered a Geoscience Remote Sensing Seminar, titled "Remote Sensing Science and Technology in Support of Exploration and Safe Utilization of Energy Resources." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mark Kushner | The Role of Plasma Modeling

Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the Keynote Address at the 2016 LNF Users Symposium, titled The Role of Plasma Modeling in the Innovation Cycle for Nanofabrication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

Google-funded Flint Water App Helps Residents Find Lead Risk, Resources

Faculty and students at Michigan's Ann Arbor and Flint campuses have released an app that provides Flint residents with data about the ongoing water crisis. The app was developed with support from Google.org. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

The Office of Naval Research has awarded Prof. Dmitry Berenson $1.1 million to help advance a robot's ability to walk over unstable ground and deal with tangles in string, rope or wire. One of the new abilities that Berenson and his group will help robots attain is navigating unfamiliar environments by reusing previous experience from similar environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Video: The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility is a state-of- the-art cleanroom that provides advanced micro- and nano-fabrication equipment and expertise to internal and external researchers. The LNF enables cutting edge research, including semiconductor materials and devices, electronic circuits, solid-state lighting, energy, biotechnology, medical devices and unconventional materials and processing technologies. Learn more in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

Ushering in the Next Generation of Flat-Panel Displays and Medical Imagers

Research that is expected to directly impact the future of the flat-panel display and imager industries has been selected as an Editor's Choice by the Journal of Solid-State Electronics. The article, co-authored by Prof. Jerzy Kanicki, ECE graduate student Chumin Zhao, and Dr. Mitsuru Nakata, describes a new technology that may help usher in the next generation of flat-panel displays and imagers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Kanicki, Jerzy  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Professor to Congress: "Internet of Things security is woefully inadequate"

As the Internet of Things grows around us, so do the threat of cybersecurity breaches severe enough to shut down hospitals and other vital infrastructure. This is the message that Prof. Kevin Fu delivered to lawmakers at a congressional hearing this week. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Video: Prof. Cindy Finelli and Engineering Education Research

Prof. Finelli is currently Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering, and she was founding director at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching in Engineering at Michigan, which supports college-wide initiatives in engineering teaching and learning. Her own research focuses on how faculty make decisions about what theyre doing in the classroom, how students understand engineering concepts, and how a flexible classroom influences both teaching and learning. Watch a new video about her and her work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Kevin Fu Testifies on the Role of Connected Devices in Recent Cyber Attacks

Prof. Kevin Fu testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee on the role of connected devices in recent cyber attacks on Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016. Follow the link to see a video of the proceedings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Harsha Madhyastha Selected for Facebook Faculty Award

Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha has been selected as the recipient of a Facebook Faculty Award for his work in distributed systems and computer networking. His recent research has focused on enabling latency-sensitive web services to optimize user experience. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Using cyber security to keep your ballot safe ahead of the presidential election

This TV news segment features an interview with CSE graduate student Matthew Bernhard. He is interviewed about the possibility for stolen votes in the upcoming election. His answer: Michigan has a paper ballot/optical scan system, which is considered best practice. Touchscreen, paperless systems like those in Ohio, Virginia, and some other states are not secure enough yet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jia Deng Selected as Recipient of PAMI Mark Everingham Prize

Prof. Jia Deng has won the PAMI Everingham Prize for his work in developing ImageNet, a large-scale labeled image database that has powered many recent advances in computer vision. The award is presented at the ECCV Conference to a researcher, or a team of researchers, who have made a selfless contribution of significant benefit to other members of the computer vision community. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Deng, Jia  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Solving the "Christmas light" problem so solar panels can handle shade

Just 10 percent shade cover can create a 50 percent drop in solar panel electricity production. Prof. Al-Thaddeus Avestrus is working to ensure power produced by a solar panel reflects the average over all the cells. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  Sustainability  

COVE: A Tool for Advancing Progress in Computer Vision

A new project has been launched to provide open and easy access to up-to-date, varied, data sets, annotations and their relevant tools. Based at the University of Michigan with collaborators at Boston University and the University of Notre Dame, the program aims to centralize available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE. The project promises to have an immediate and far-reaching impact on the computer vision community as well as researchers involved in machine learning, multimedia, natural language processing, data mining, and information retrieval. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Shadows in the Dark Web

Secrets lurk in the dark web, the 95 percent of the internet that most of us can't see. Prof. Michael Cafarella is bringing some of those secrets to light, and in the process making the digital and the real world a little safer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new device for studying tumor cells can trap 10,000 individual cells in a single chip. The technique, developed by Prof. Euisik Yoon's group, could one day help screen potential cancer treatments based on an individual patients tumor and help researchers better understand so-called cancer stem cells. It also shed light on a controversy: are large cells or small cells more likely to be cancer stem cells? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

How big data and algorithms are slashing the cost of fixing Flints water crisis

Michigan researchers, including the Michigan Data Science student team, are using new algorithmic and statistical tools to help inform crisis response in Flint. Profs. Jacob Abernethy and Eric Schwartz of the Business School explain how in this article at the Conversation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Student Teams and Organizations  

Hacking Healthcare - How Big Data is Driving Big Changes in Medicine

The article by CoE writer Gabe Cherry highlights the work being done by Jenna Wiens and her collaborators on using big data to predict which hospital patients are at risk of developing a life-threatening intestinal infection called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. It also provides context on the big data initiatives taking at UM in general and with respect to healthcare, and across EECS, including work by Prof. Barzan Mozafari on how to improve the design of big data databases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Michielssen, Eric  Mower Provost, Emily  Mozafari, Barzan  Wiens, Jenna  

Correlation is Not Causation: Electrical Analysis of St. Jude Implant Shows Normal Pacing

This blog post by the Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security provides additional technical detail regarding the claims by Muddy Waters and St. Jude regarding pacemaker/defibrillator security. Prof. Kevin Fu, who heads the Archimedes Center, and his collaborators at Michigan have concluded that those claims are questionable. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Holes Found in Report on St. Jude Medical Device Security

Michigan researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu have reproduced experiments alleging security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices and have concluded that those claims are questionable. The report alleging the security flaws was released last week by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Necmiye Ozay Receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a NASA Early Career Faculty award for her project, "Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems." Her research will be designed to assist in future missions in space, while being applicable to a wide range of cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Space technology  

Several Michigan Papers Presented at 2016 USENIX Security Symposium

Five papers authored by CSE researchers were presented at the 2016 USENIX Security Symposium, which took place August 10-12 in Austin, TX, and two papers were presented at WOOT 2016. USENIX Security brings together researchers from both academia and industry interested in the latest advances in the security of computer systems and networks. The symposium is a premier venue for security and privacy research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Shin, Kang G.  

Researchers David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman Receive Pwnie Award for Work on DROWN Attack

A research team that includes CSE PhD student David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been awarded the Pwnie Award for Best Cryptographic Attack at the Black Hat conference for their work on the DROWN attack. DROWN allows attackers to break encryption used to protect HTTPS websites and read or steal sensitive communications, including passwords, credit card numbers, trade secrets, or financial data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Solar power plant: $1.4M grant aims to cut costs

Nanotechnology could reduce the cost of the most expensive part of a solar thermal power plant by roughly 75 percent. The Department of Energy gave a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, the University of Michigan and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory $1.4 million to develop new solar concentrators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  

CSE-Based Startup Receives Funding to Develop Systems Based on Intelligent Personal Assistant Technology

Artificial Intelligence startup Clinc, founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang along with Research Fellow Michael Laurenzano and CSE graduate student Johann Hauswald, is off and running in downtown Ann Arbor. On August 4, 2016, the company announced a $225,000 National Science Foundation Grant and closure of a $1.2 million round of seed funding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Researchers Seek to Help the Disabled with Intelligent Robotic Wheelchair

Prof. Ben Kuipers, CSE graduate student Collin Johnson, and researcher Dr. Jong Jin Park have created Vulcan, an intelligent robotic wheelchair. Vulcan learns the spatial structure of the environment it moves through and it uses that knowledge to plan and follow routes from place to place. Robotic wheelchairs will benefit people who need a wheelchair, but are unable to use one because of multiple disabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

With Over 7 Million Certificates Issued, Let's Encrypt Aims to Secure the Entire Web

Let's Encrypt, the non-profit certificate authority founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman with colleagues at Mozilla and Electronic Frontier Foundation, is well on its way to securing the web. By making the switch to HTTPS free and easy, Let's Encrypt has issued over 7 million certificates since December 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  

New Venture is on the Path to Build Continual Learning AIs

Cogitai, Inc., a continual learning company co-founded by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja, is developing AI technology that empowers machines to learn from interaction with the real world, enabling everyday things that sense and act to get smarter, more skilled, and more knowledgeable with experience. The company has recently announced funding by Sony. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Pioneering Engineering Education Research

A new initiative at the College of Engineering has brought U-M into the spotlight in the field of Engineering Education Research (EER). Spearheaded by Prof. David C. Munson, Jr. while he was Dean, the College took a unique approach to EER by embedding faculty directly into traditional engineering departments. A few other institutions had already developed standalone departments or schools for EER with their own sets of faculty and PhD students, but U-Ms approach is the first of its kind. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Data Equality on the Internet Might Bring Unintended Consequences

Prof. Harsha Madhyastha was interviewed on Michigan Radio about the possibilities for unintended consequences of net neutrality, and the difficulty of finding an acceptable alternative. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

Since he received a robot capable of walking outside, Jessy Grizzle has heard the siren call of the Wave Field, the undulating earthen art installation outside the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud building. MARLO finally got her shot at it. For now, Jessy and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that Grizzle calls merely very difficult. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

A Bipedal Robot Gets Its Swagger On

Popular Science watches MARLO take a stroll across the wave field for the first time. "She's trained her whole life for this moment: MARLO recently stomped and stumbled her way through a new milestone at University of Michigan's Wave Field. The field an art installation turned robot testing ground offers new challenges for the bipedal robot's lateral and forward balance, because of its uneven terrain." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

MARLO the bipedal robot seems to be tipsy

MARLO has captured worldwide attention again with her exploration of the wave field on North Campus. As she tries to navigate the steep bumps with no sensors, just extraordinarily clever algorithms that have her adapting to what she "steps in," she appears to be, well, a bit drunk. This drunken behavior is just MARLO pushing the extremes of what a human-sized bipedal robot can do. See her on Gizmodo, Aol.On and MSN Video
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Can Slower Financial Traders Find a Haven in a World of High-Speed Algorithms?

In this article at The Conversation, Prof. Michael Wellman reviews the latency arms race at the center of high-speed algorithmic trading, in which the first trader to react is able to make money off of slower rivals. He describes the possibility for a frequent call market, in which speed no longer categorically prevails, and how it could be implemented. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wenisch, Thomas  

Tracking and Mitigating Tail Latency in Data Centers

Computer science researchers have developed a modular load tester platform for data centers which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency. Called Treadmill, it is described in their paper, "Treadmill: Attributing the Source of Tail Latency through Precise Load Testing and Statistical Inference." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Two Michigan Papers Win Top Awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

Two papers authored by EECS researchers were selected for top honors at the 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. One of the papers, describing and demonstrating a malicious hardware backdoor, received the Distinguished Paper Award. The second, which demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform, received the Distinguished Practical Paper Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Hicks, Matt  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Proxy Optimizes Webpage Loading for Better User Experience

Researchers led by Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha have developed a new web proxy called Klotski, which seeks to improve users' perceptions of how quickly a webpage loads on a mobile device by maximizing the amount of important content on the page that is fetched and displayed within the users attention span. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

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