EECS
EECS

Research News

New secure architecture confounds hackers with randomization

Prof. Todd Austin is leading development of a new hardware architecture designed to guard against hackers. The two lead PhD students on the project, Mark Gallagher and Lauren Biernacki, produced a promotional video detailing the strengths of Morpheus' randomization approach. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  

Two solutions for GPU efficiency can boost AI performance

GPUs are employed by large computing clusters for both training and inference of deep learning models, and Prof. Mosharaf Chowdhury and his students, Juncheng Gu and Peifeng Yu, are working to multiply the number of jobs a cluster can finish in a set amount of time and streamline methods of sharing resources on the fly with two new open-source tools. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Warehouse-Scale and Parallel Systems  

Personalized knowledge graphs for faster search and digital assistants

Prof. Danai Koutra has proposed a mobile solution to develop constantly-evolving, personalized knowledge bases that identify information thats most relevant to the users changing interests. Koutra and her collaborators are working to take on this shortcoming with graphs that are customized, stored locally, and able to change over time. Koutra earned an Amazon Research Award for the project. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Interactive Systems  Mobile Computing  

Election security: Halderman recommends actions to ensure integrity of US systems

Prof. J. Alex Halderman testified in front of the US House Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Service and General Government, urging lawmakers to approve additional funding for election cybersecurity prior to the upcoming 2020 elections. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

A new $1.6M energy project to develop low cost manufacturing of white organic lighting

Prof. Stephen Forrest is developing an automated high-yield roll-to-roll process to manufacture organic LEDs for lighting. [Full Story]

New research for the future of sustainable power and energy

Take a look at some of the exciting new projects that will help define the next evolution of sustainable power and energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Energy Science and Engineering  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Ozay, Necmiye  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

Battery economics could power the future of energy

Prof. Johanna Mathieu of EECS and Prof. Catherine Hausman of Public Policy are heading a new project to explore the social costs and benefits of battery energy storage on the electrical grid. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

"Air traffic control" for driverless cars could speed up deployment

Research led by Prof. Walter Lasecki shows how human-generated responses could remotely assist autonomous vehicles decisions during times of uncertainty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Data and Computing  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

Built by humans. Ruled by computers.

H.V. Jagadish, the Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at U-M, has been tapped to lead the Center for Responsible Information Technology, a U-M think tank thats now in development. It will aim to help technologists use algorithmic systems and other IT advances in a socially responsible way. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Cybersecurity  Jagadish, HV  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Online censorship detector aims to make the internet a freer place

In an advance that could one day provide a comprehensive, publicly available window into worldwide internet censorship, a team led by Prof. Roya Ensafi has turned public internet servers across the globe into automated sentries that can monitor and report when access to websites is being blocked. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Ensafi, Roya  Lab-Systems  

How air conditioners could advance a renewable power grid

In an approach that wont disrupt consumers, researchers will tackle two of the biggest issues in the energy industry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

More efficient machine vision technology modeled on human vision

Prof. Robert Dick and advisee Ekdeep Singh Lubana developed a new technique called Digital Foveation that significantly improves the efficiency of machine vision applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Dick, Robert  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Time-varying metamaterials for next generation communication, sensing, and defense systems

With $7.5M MURI grant, Professor Anthony Grbic is developing metamaterials for a new generation of integrated electromagnetic and photonic systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Communications  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sensing and Sensors  

Laura Balzano receives ARO Young Investigator Award to improve high-dimensional big data problems

Applications include managing large networked systems, such as sensor networks, power grids, or computer networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Data and Computing  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Toward brain-like computing: New memristor better mimics synapses

A new electronic device developed by Prof. Wei Lu and collaborators can directly model the behaviors of a synapse, which is a connection between two neurons. For the first time, the way that neurons share or compete for resources can be explored in hardware without the need for complicated circuits. "Neuroscientists have argued that competition and cooperation behaviors among synapses are very important. Our new memristive devices allow us to implement a faithful model of these behaviors in a solid-state system," said Lu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Bridging the "last centimeter barrier" in electronic communications

Michigan Engineering researchers led by Prof. Pinaki Mazumder have created a new chip interconnect technology using terahertz surface-wave interconnects that will enable ultra fast data transmissions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mazumder, Pinaki  

Taking on the limits of computing power

By harnessing the power and speed of graphics processing units, a University of Michigan startup can dramatically accelerate gene sequencing, shortening tasks that took multiple days to a single hour. Ann Arbor-based Parabricks Inc. was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Phase II grant of $748,000.

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Health and Safety  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Helping drivers use smart cars smarter

Profs. Jason Mars, Lingja Tang, CSE students Shih-Chieh Lin, Chang-Hong Hsu, and Yunqi Zhang, and Ford Motor Company have developed a conversational in-vehicle digital assistant that can respond to drivers questions and commands in natural language, helping them get to know the autonomous tools their cars have to offer. Their paper earned Honorable Mention Award in the Best Paper competition at this years ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Using drones, a new software tool can bring LTE networks anywhere

Prof. Z. Morley Mao and alumnus Mehrdad Moradi (PhD CSE 2018) earned a best paper award at this year's ACM MobiCom for their work on SkyCore, a reliable new way to deploy LTE networks using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The paper, SkyCore: Moving Core to the Edge for Untethered and Reliable UAV-based LTE networks, demonstrated a way to connect hotspots on drones with commercial networks and smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  

A window into the future of solar power

Prof. Stephen Forrest is looking to have windows double as efficient solar cells in buildings of the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Forrest, Stephen  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Co-founded by Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani and alumnus and research scientist Dr. Yutao Qin, the company's subscription service offers real-time monitoring [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Gianchandani, Yogesh  Health and Safety  LNF  MEMS and Microsystems  Sensing and Sensors  

403 Forbidden Study reveals new data on region-specific website blocking practices

New work led by Prof. Roya Ensafi and PhD student Allison McDonald undertook the first wide-scale measurement study of server-side geographic restrictions, or geoblocking, a phenomenon in which websites block access for users in particular countries or regions, a phenomenon on the rise causing Internet balkanization. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ensafi, Roya  Graduate Students  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

Photosynthesis and Clean Energy

In this interview with Scitech Now, Prof. Zetian Mi talks about a new way to create energy from the sun - borrowing from the idea of photosynthesis. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Energy Science and Engineering  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Mi, Zetian  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

$6.8M initiative to enable American laser renaissance

After Europe and Asia surpassed U.S. in high intensity laser research in the early 2000s, the Department of Energy is funding new collaborative research network to make the U.S. more competitive. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lasers and Optics  

U-M researchers develop small device that bends light to generate new radiation

Prof. Roberto Merlin led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. Prof. Anthony Grbic led the team that designed the metasurface with former doctoral student Carl Pfeiffer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

Prof. Jenna Wiens group had two papers highlighted in a session on the top 10 most influential papers in healthcare epidemiology and infection control at Infectious Disease Week (IDWeek 2018). The papers were selected for their impact, the number of times they were cited in the preceding two years, and their potential effect on future research and technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

Using machine learning to decode the unpredictable world of human emotion might seem like an unusual choice. But in the ambiguity of human expression, U-M computer science and engineering associate professor Emily Mower Provost has discovered a rich trove of data waiting to be analyzed. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Making software failures a little less catastrophic

Prof. Baris Kasikci presented a new technique called REPT REverse debugging with Processor Trace. In the paper REPT: Reverse Debugging of Failures in Deployed Software, Kasikci and collaborators propose a method to recreate the failing program execution to better diagnose the problem at hand. This technique is now deployed on Windows systems and the Windows Debugger platform. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Software Systems  

Gaining a deeper understanding of how personal values are expressed in text

Content analysis of large collections of text is often a useful first step in understanding what people are talking or writing about. PhD student Steve Wilson, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Master student Yiting Shen have proposed a new method of performing these analyses in their paper, Building and Validating Hierarchical Lexicons with a Case Study on Personal Values. The researchers earned a Best Paper Award at the 2018 International Conference on Social Informatics (SocInfo) for their work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Tyche: A new permission model to defend against smart home hacks

Prof. Atul Prakash, CSE PhD student Kevin Eykholt, and CSE alumni Amir Rahmati and Earlence Fernandes have proposed Tyche, a safer app permissions system for smart homes and the Internet of Things. Their paper on this project, Tyche: A Risk-Based Permission Model for Smart Homes, received a Best Paper Award at the IEEE Cybersecurity Development Conference. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Systems  Prakash, Atul  

Active learning study may lead to a step toward broader change in higher education

Rare in engineering education research, the project directed by Prof. Cindy Finelli involves a randomized control trial to determine if its effective [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

It takes two photonic qubits to make quantum computing possible

Professors Ku and Steel are applying their expertise to take key next steps toward practical quantum computing in the NSF project, Two-Photon Quantum Photonic Logic Gates Enabled by Photonic Bound States. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Optics and Photonics  Quantum Science and Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Steel, Duncan  

Conducting an orchestra of sensor nodes

PhD student Farzad Asgarian keeps time in the Internet of Things with frequency scaling, allowing for lower power sensor nodes that are more accurate. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Najafi, Khalil  Sensing and Sensors  

Detecting Huntington's disease with an algorithm that analyzes speech

In an advance that could one day provide new insight into the progression of neurological diseases like Huntington's disease, Alzheimers and Parkinson's, researchers including Prof. Emily Mower Provost have demonstrated the first automated system that uses speech analysis to detect Huntington's disease. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Solving Impossible Equations

Eric Michielssen and collaborators have received the Sergei A. Schelkunoff Transactions Prize Paper Award for research impacting the ability to rapidly analyze electromagnetic phenomena. This award is presented to the authors of the best paper published in the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation during the previous year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Michielssen, Eric  

The new law that will guide the future of information processing

Professor S. Sandeep Pradhan is working with Cambridge University on the new law of small numbers, which could impact the next generation of information processing networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Information Technology  Internet of Things  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  

Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human

An algorithm-based system that identifies telltale linguistic cues in fake news stories could provide news aggregator and social media sites like Google News with a new weapon in the fight against misinformation. Led by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, the researchers have demonstrated that its comparable to and sometimes better than humans at correctly identifying fake news stories. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Communications  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Making online communication smarter with Trove Video

Trove is an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup built on the vision of improving communication using artificial intelligence. Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki are collaborating with the company to develop novel methods and tools that will help make intelligent online communication smarter. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Communications  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lasecki, Walter  

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

A newly discovered processor vulnerability could potentially put secure information at risk in any Intel-based PC manufactured since 2008. It could affect users who rely on a digital lockbox feature known as Intel Software Guard Extensions, or SGX, as well as those who utilize common cloud-based services. CSE researchers contributed to the discovery of the security hole, called Foreshadow. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Blue Sky and Research Accelerator Initiatives fund solar fuel and high-power research

Zetian Mi leads a Blue Sky Initiative to contribute to clean water and renewable fuel, while Becky Peterson leads an effort to improve how we manufacture the electronics needed for high-power devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mi, Zetian  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Power and Energy  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

Memory-processing unit (MPU) could bring memristors to the masses

AI, weather forecasting and data science would all benefit from computers that store and process data in the same place. Professor Wei Lu is working on memristors that could be up to the task. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Using software to beat Moore's Law: $9.5M to design the reconfigurable computer

In search of a new way to overcome the limitations of silicon, Prof. Ron Dreslinski is leading a project with a $9.5million DARPA grant to develop a hardware architecture and software ecosystem that together can approach the power of ASICs with the flexibility of a CPU. Called Transmuter, this software-defined hardware can change how programs use the hardware available to them in real time, effectively acting as a reconfigurable computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

A new hybrid chip that can change its own wiring

As part of a national effort to advance electronics technology, Hun-Seok Kim, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, will lead a $5.2 million project to develop a new type of system-on-chip (SoC) that mixes together the adaptability of general purpose processors with the efficiency of specialized processors, allowing for demanding applications such as highly intelligent wireless communication systems used in radar and swarms of autonomous devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Kim, Hun-Seok  Mudge, Trevor  

Enabling anyone to design hardware with a new open-source tool

In a $6.5 million U-M-led project that could revolutionize and democratize designing hardware devices, Professors Wentzloff, Blaauw, Dreslinski, and Sylvester will work to create an open-source hardware compiler that aims to reduce the six month process of hand-designing analog circuits to a dramatically faster and automated 24-hour routine. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Michigan chips will be first to test next-generation hardware design tools

Professors Sylvester, Blaauw, and Dreslinski will test tools and provide feedback in a national program that aims to build free, open-source electronic design automation tools. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Tool for structuring data creates efficiency for data scientists

Transforming messy data into a usable state turns out to be labor-intensive and tedious. Traditionally, domain experts handwrite task-specific scripts to transform unstructured data. Enter Foofah, a project developed by CSE graduate students Zhongjun Jin and Michael Anderson, Prof. Michael Cafarella, and Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science H.V. Jagadish that can help to minimize the effort and required background knowledge needed to clean up data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Graduate Students  Jagadish, HV  

An even smaller world's smallest computer

The Michigan team behind the original Michigan Micro Mote, the world's smallest computer, has gone even smaller, with a device that measures just 0.3 mm to a side -- dwarfed by a grain of rice. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health and Safety  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Millimeter-scale Computing  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sensing and Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

Undocumented immigrants' privacy at risk online, on phones

Every day, undocumented immigrants in the U.S. face discrimination, surveillance, deportation, and other dangers. When it comes to their smartphones, immigrants struggle to apply instinctive caution, according to a study by a team of University of Michigan researchers that included CSE PhD student Allison McDonald. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

L. Jay Guo and his team are applying color-coding to particles that are about the size of color itself, allowing scientists to quickly determine the size of nanoparticles, which can help in biomedical drug delivery, biological sensors, advanced coatings, and lithography of more advanced computer chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Cafarella Receives VLDB Test of Time Award for Structured Web Data Search

This award is given to the VLDB paper published ten years earlier that has had the most influence since its publication. In this paper, Cafarella and co-authors Alon Halevy, Zhe Daisy Wang, Eugene Wu, and Yang Zhang set out to determine how to provide search-engine-style access to huge volumes of structured web data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  

Show All