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Research News

Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, and his collaborators have created an automated chatbot that uses artificial intelligence to weed through the fine print of privacy policies so that you will know what you're agreeing to. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Shin, Kang G.  

Michigan researchers predict emotions by examining the correlation between tweets and environmental factors

Research fellow Carmen Banea, alumna Vicki Liu, and Prof. Rada Mihalcea explored the concept of grounded emotions, focusing on how external factors, ranging from weather, news exposure, social network emotion charge, timing, and mood predisposition may have a bearing on ones emotion level throughout the day. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  

Internet-scanning U-M startup pioneers new approach to cybersecurity

Ann Arbor-based Censys has launched based on work done over the past 5 years in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's lab. Censys is the first commercially available internet-wide scanning tool. It helps IT experts working to secure large networks, which are composed of a constantly changing array of devices ranging from servers to smartphones and internet-of-things devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Prof. Amir Mortazawi Introduces Robust Wireless Power Transfer

In this video, Prof. Mortazawi introduces his work in improving wireless charging. Compared to conventional methods of wireless power, which require a specific distance and alignment, Prof. Mortazawi's version operates over a range of distances and orientations without a drop in power. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mortazawi, Amir  Power and Energy  Wireless Systems  

Semiconductor Breakthrough May Be Game-changer for Organic Solar Cells

In an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

Reimagining how computers are designed: University of Michigan leads new $32M center

The Center for Applications Driving Architectures, or ADA, at the University of Michigan will develop a transformative, "plug-and-play" ecosystem to encourage a flood of fresh ideas in computing frontiers such as autonomous control, robotics and machine-learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

U-M startup May Mobility blazes toward autonomous fleet market

May Mobility, co-founded and led by Prof. Edwin Olson, has tested its autonomous vehicles on the streets of Downtown Detroit. The startup recently licensed five autonomous driving related technologies from U-M, and outside of the life sciences, is the most successful UM startup in raising first round of funding so quickly. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

CSE Researchers Funded to Enhance Online Communication

Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki have been awarded two grants from Trove.ai, an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup, to develop novel methods and tools that will unleash the power of online communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

New quick-learning neural network powered by memristors

Prof. Wei Lu led a team in creating a new type of neural network made with memristors, which can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Unhackable Computer Under Development with $3.6M DARPA Grant

By turning computer circuits into unsolvable puzzles, a University of Michigan team aims to create an unhackable computer with a new $3.6 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Todd Austin, a professor of computer science and engineering, leads the project, called MORPHEUS. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Cybersecurity  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Prof. Mohammed Islam developed a small chemical sensor device that will be able to detect "single-fingerprint quantities" of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away. It could potentially be used to identify traces of drugs and explosives and speed the analysis of certain medical samples. It could also be mounted on a drone or carried by doctors, police, border officials and soldiers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Optics and Photonics  

New biodegradable hydrogel offers eco-friendly alternative to synthetics

Professor Jerzy Kanicki and an international team of collaborators have developed a new hydrogel made from natural and biodegradable materials that allows for applications in agriculture and medicine without the potential risks of synthetic hydrogels. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kanicki, Jerzy  Sustainability and Environment  

Seed-sized U-M computers pumped into oil wells featured at the Houston Museum of Natural Science

A specially created version of the Michigan Micro Mote, measuring 5mmx5mm, is being featured for its role in oil exploration as part of a new exhibit at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Energy Science and Engineering  Grbic, Anthony  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

3D Printing Technology Facilitates Fabrication Of A Curved Organic Photodetector For Image Sensing Devices

Prof. Jerzy Kanicki and his team developed a new fabrication method for curved substrates using a 3D printing process. The technique will enable next-generation camera systems or artificial eyes, as well as high performance image sensing devices for breast cancer detection and other more. Read the paper in Advanced Materials Technologies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Kanicki, Jerzy  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

2017 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition Highlights Outstanding Research

CSE held its fourteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 8. The top presentation competition was "Analyzing and Enhancing the Security of Modern Memory Systems," given by Salessawi Ferede Yitbarek, who represented CSE's Hardware research area. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Prof. Chris Peikert Receives TCC Test of Time Award for Work in Lattice Cryptography

Chris Peikert, the Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor in Theoretical Computer Science, and his co-author Alon Rosen have received the TCC Test of Time Award for their paper on efficient collision-resistant hashing on cyclic lattices. The award is a recognition of a long line of works by Prof. Peikert and others who laid the foundations for practically efficient lattice-based cryptography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

Michigan Researchers Win Best Paper Award at DFT 2017

John P. Hayes, Claude E. Shannon Professor of Engineering Science, and CSE graduate student Paishun Ting have received the Best Paper Award at the 30th IEEE Symposium on Defect and Fault Tolerance for their work in eliminating a hidden source of error in stochastic circuits. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Graduate Students  Hayes, John  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

New Funding for High-Fidelity Nerve Mapping Research

The NIH's Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) program awarded a U-M project $1 million in funding to develop highly-compliant microneedle arrays for peripheral nerve mapping. The team's project director and principal investigator is John Seymour. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health and Safety  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

U-M Receives $1.6M Toward Artificial Intelligence for Data Science

A team from the University of Michigan has received $1.6 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to help develop a toolkit so that anyone can use big data to help answer questions and ultimately speed up the process of discovery. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  

Cooling off with Lasers

Prof. Stephen Rand and his team are studying how to use lasers to cool down solid matter. Besides breaking common notions about lasers, there are several applications for the refrigeration of solids with light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lasers and Optics  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Precise pulses explore light's magnetism

A new laser will investigate an unusual magnetic effect that may lead to efficient solar energy harvesting. The new laser facility is housed in the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), directed by Prof. Stephen Rand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Rand, Stephen  

Doubling the power of the world's most intense laser

The most intense laser in the world is about to get a power upgrade with $2 million from the National Science Foundation. With more laser energy to focus, researchers at the University of Michigan and collaborators from around the world can make better tabletop devices that produce particle and X-ray beams for medical and national security applications and also explore mysteries in astrophysics and the quantum realm [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Maksimchuk, Anatoly  Nees, John A.  Optics and Photonics  Willingale, Louise  

Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-in

Voice authentication is easy to spoof. New technology could help close this open channel. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Shin, Kang G.  

Precision Health at Michigan

Learn more about Michigan's new initiative to lead in precision health: using advanced tools and technology to provide personalized solutions to improve an individual's health and wellness. Lead by co-director Eric Michielssen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Big Data  Health and Safety  Michielssen, Eric  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Manos Kapritsos and Collaborators Win USENIX Security Paper Award

A team of researchers including Prof. Manos Kapritsos has won a Distinguished Paper Award at the 2017 USENIX Security Symposium for Vale, a new programming language and tool that supports flexible, automated verification of high-performance cryptographic assembly code. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Kapritsos, Manos  Lab-Software Systems  

Using University of Michigan buildings as batteries

Michigan researchers and staff are testing how to use the immense thermal energy of large buildings as theoretical battery packs. The goal is to help the nations grid better accommodate renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

Michigan, Georgia Tech Researchers Funded to Deter Financial Market Manipulation

Researchers at the University of Michigan and the Georgia Institute of Technology will develop innovative approaches to detecting and deterring the computerized manipulation of financial markets under a $1M grant from the National Science Foundations's Big Data program. Michael Wellman, the Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, is project director and one of five PIs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Improving Natural Language Processing with Demographic-Aware Models

Michigan researchers, including Prof. Rada Mihalcea, research fellow Carmen Banea, and graduate student Aparna Garimella have found that word associations vary across different demographics, and researchers can build better natural language processing models if they can account for demographics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Getting People Moving: Walking Exoskeletons Could Mobilize Disabled Patients

PhD student Omar Harib, postdoctoral researcher Ayonga Hereid, and PhD student Eva Mungai spent four days in July working with French company Wandercraft in Paris. The company's goal is to create an exoskeleton that will allow patients that are paralyzed from the waist down to walk upright, with a natural gait and the freedom to use their hands. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Health and Safety  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

BugMD: Automatic Mismatch Diagnosis for Bug Triaging

Today's incredibly dense microprocessors take more time to verify for correctness than they do to design, and bugs are extremely difficult to track down and correct. CSE researchers have introduced BugMD, an automatic bug triaging solution that collects multiple architectural-level mismatches and employs a classifier to pinpoint buggy design units. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

'Learning Database' Speeds Queries from Hours to Seconds

University of Michigan researchers developed software called Verdict that enables existing databases to learn from each query a user submits, finding accurate answers without trawling through the same data again and again. Verdict allows databases to deliver answers more than 200 times faster while maintaining 99 percent accuracy. In a research environment, that could mean getting answers in seconds instead of hours or days. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

Codeon is the Intelligent Assistant for Software Developers

Researchers, including Profs. Walter S. Lasecki and Steve Oney, and graduate students Yan Chen and Yin Xie have created Codeon, a system that enables more effective task hand-off between end-user developers and remote helpers by allowing asynchronous responses to on-demand requests. With Codeon, developers can request help by speaking their requests aloud within the context of their Integrated Development Environment. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

BigANT Tackles the Wave Field

Prof. Shai Revzen's lab has developed an inexpensive technique to rapidly fabricate a variety of useful robots, requiring only their modules and two stock materials. One of the lab's modular bots, BigANT, just received a major redesign that lets it walk over grass, up hills, and across uneven surfaces. It took on north campus' biggest terrain challenge, the Wave Field, in this new video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Accelerating the Mobile Web: Vroom Software Could Double its Speed

Vroom software, developed by computer scientists including Prof. Harsha Madhyastha and CSE graduate student Vaspol Ruamviboonsuk, can dramatically speed the loading of webpages on mobile devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Mobile Computing  

Kurator Will Help You Curate Your Personal Digital Content

People capture photos, audio recordings, video, and more on a daily basis, but organizing all these digital artifacts quickly becomes a daunting task. Automated solutions struggle to help us manage this data because they cannot understand its meaning. Profs. Walter Lasecki and Mark Ackerman have helped create Kurator, a hybrid intelligence system leveraging mixed-expertise crowds to help families curate their personal digital content. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ackerman, Mark  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

Movie Design for Specific Target Audiences

Creating products that satisfy the market is critical to companies as it determines their success and revenue. Currently, experts use their judgment to estimate solutions to designing a new product that will satisfy customers, but this does not scale or allow leveraging massive datasets. Prof. Danai Koutra and her colleagues sought to identify how they can design new movies with features tailored to a specific user population. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  

CHORUS: The Crowd-Powered Conversational Assistant

Prof. Walter Lasecki and his colleagues have developed a crowd-powered conversational assistant, Chorus, and deployed it to see how users and workers would interact together when mediated by the system. Chorus is capable of providing users with relevant responses instead of merely search results by recruiting workers on demand, who in turn decide what the best response is for each user sentence. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

Social Interaction Patterns Provide Clues to Real Life Changes

Researchers including Prof. Danai Koutra have explored the dynamics of individual user interactions in social networks by creating iNET, a comprehensive analytic and visualization framework that provides personalized insights into user behavior. The researchers view their work as a first step towards fully exploring the amount and type of information that can be extracted from the online social footprint of a person. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists. The technology exists to stimulate and map circuits in the brain, but neuroscientists have yet to tap this potential. Now, developers of these technologies are coming together to demonstrate and share them to drive a rapid advance in our understanding of the brain, funded by $7.75 million from the National Science Foundation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health and Safety  Yoon, Euisik  

Apps available for your smartphone could steal your personal information

WXYZ Detroit reports on work by UM researchers that has exposed dangerous open ports in mobile platforms that can be taken advantage of by hackers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  

Seeing through materials with visible light

With yogurt and crushed glass, Prof. Raj Nadakuditi's group have taken a step toward using visible light to image inside the body. Their method for focusing light through these materials is much faster and simpler than today's dominant approach. By understanding exactly how a patch of skin scatters the light, researchers hope to carefully pattern light beams so that they focus inside the bodya first step toward seeing into it. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Medical Imaging  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Norris, Theodore B.  

Dmitry Berenson Helps Robots Play Nice with People (with Video)

Prof. Dmitry Berenson wants robots to help us out anywhere, any time. In order to do so, he's working with state of the art equipment to design algorithms for robotic manipulation. These algorithms could turn a hunk of metal into a useful household assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Breakthrough for Large Scale Computing: Memory Disaggregation Made Practical

CSE researchers have introduced Infiniswap, the first system to scalably implement cluster-wide memory disaggregation, whereby the memory of all the servers in a computing cluster is transparently exposed as a single memory pool to all the applications in the cluster. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Shin, Kang G.  Software Systems  

Next-gen computing inspired by biology

Inspired by how mammals see, a new memristor computer circuit prototype developed by Prof. Wei Lu has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude faster and with much less power than todays most advanced systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Zhang, Zhengya  

Sister cell profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan including Prof. Euisik Yoon developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health and Safety  Yoon, Euisik  

Shai Revzen part of a new five-institution MURI focused on the control of dynamic systems

Prof. Shai Revzen is a member of a five-institution team that will take advantage of recent advances in computation to exploit the promise of the Koopman Theory for modeling and control of dynamic systems.

The research is funded under a $6.25 million, five-year Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI) based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and called From Data-Driven Operator Theoretic Schemes to Prediction, Inference and Control of Systems (DDOTS to PICS).
[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Open Ports Act As Security Wormholes Into Mobile Devices

Computer science and engineering researchers at the University of Michigan have for the first time characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Building More Stable Quadruped Robots: A Dog's Point of View

Research into the gait of dogs may lead to improved design of quadruped robots and how we control their movement. Shai Revzen, a biologist turned roboticist, brings a unique perspective to the study of animals, one thats beginning to be heard by the biological community as well. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

How to Build a BigANT Shai Revzen's Critter-Inspired Robots

Want to build your own robot fast and cheap? Shai Revzen is making that easier with his plate and reinforced flexure (PARF) fabrication technique. He used PARF to develop the meter-scale hexapedal robot known as BigANT, whose design files are available to all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down by Prof. Jay Guo, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. It could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

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