Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

2017 SURE/SROP Research Projects: Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

Directions: Below are listed the most recent descriptions of 2017 SURE and SROP projects available in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). Please consider this list carefully before applying to the SURE or SROP program (http://www.engin.umich.edu/gradadmissions/sure/index.html). You are welcome to contact faculty if you have additional, specific questions regarding these projects. 

*IMPORTANT*: In addition to their online application, SURE applicants for ECE projects must also submit a resume and statement explaining their interest in and qualifications for the project that most interests them, including why they want to work on the project, the relevant skills they bring, and what they expect from their experience. The statement should be no longer than one page (12 point font and 1” margins) and must be uploaded in “other” at the bottom of the online application. Applications without this information may not be considered. Please include your name and UMID on all documents submitted.

SROP applicants for ECE projects should follow the specific directions outlined in the online application.


 

Research Area
Project Number
Applied Electromagnetics & RF Circuits
6, 13
Communications
12, 23, 24, 25, 32
Computer Vision
Control Systems
11, 14, 15, 31
Embedded Systems
Engineering Education Research
Integrated Circuits & VLSI
1, 5, 17, 18, 23
MEMS & Microsystems
10, 22, 26, 27
Optics & Photonics
2, 3, 4
Power & Energy
Robotics
Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning
16, 19, 25
Solid State & Nanotechnology
7, 8, 16, 28, 29, 30

 


ECE Project 1: Ultra-low Power Circuit Design for Millimeter Sized Sensor Nodes

Faculty Mentor: David Blaauw (blaauw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory circuits course (EECS 312) and VLSI design course (EECS 427) is strongly preferred.

Description: We are developing sensor nodes that have a size of 1 millimeter or less.  The sensor nodes contain a small microprocessor, a transducer, such as pressure sensor or imager, a power source such as a battery and radio circuits. Reducing a sensor processor node to this minute size allows the sensor node to be used in a host of new and interesting applications, including implanted biomedical applications and monitoring of the environment.  The work will depend on the background of the candidate and can include testing and diagnosis of fabricated chips, help with circuit design for processor, power management, and sensors, or software development for sensor applications.

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ECE Project 2: Thin Film GaAs Solar Cells and Solar Trackers

Faculty Mentor: Stephen Forrest (stevefor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Optics and Materials Science

Description: We are developing a method to fabricate extremely lightweight and high efficiency, thin film gallium arsenide solar cells. These flexible cells can be attached to mini (~2 cm3) solar concentrators and tracking mechanisms based on kirigami or other concepts to reduce the cost of solar power generation for mobile and even rooftop applications.  The student will work with a graduate student mentor on topics ranging from optical modeling and semiconductor device fabrication, to device characterization in realistic environments (e.g. outdoor exposure to sunlight) to understand the limits of our approaches and to work on improvements.

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ECE Project 3: Lifetime of Organic Light Emitting Devices

Faculty Mentor: Stephen Forrest (stevefor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Electrical Circuits, Optics and Materials Science

Description: Today, phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) are the backbone technology supporting the OLED display industry that provides smart phones, tablets, and televisions to over 1 billion consumers worldwide. However, there are numerous challenges facing their further development; chief among them is the limited lifetime of the blue emitting PHOLED.  Our project focuses on understanding and overcoming the fundamental limits to blue PHOLED lifetime. The student will work with a team of graduate students to measure the emitted light intensity from populations of blue PHOLEDs fabricated using structures testing different approaches for extending device operational lifetime. Extensive fabrication of devices and their characterization are among many of the areas to be pursued.

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ECE Project 4: Roll-to-Roll Fabrication of Reliable Thin Film Organic Solar Cells

Faculty Mentor: Stephen Forrest (stevefor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Materials Science

Description: Today, phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) are the backbone technology supporting the OLED display industry that provides smart phones, tablets, and televisions to over 1 billion consumers worldwide. However, there are numerous challenges facing their further development; chief among them is the limited lifetime of the blue emitting PHOLED.  Our project focuses on understanding and overcoming the fundamental limits to blue PHOLED lifetime. The student will work with a team of graduate students to measure the emitted light intensity from populations of blue PHOLEDs fabricated using structures testing different approaches for extending device operational lifetime. Extensive fabrication of devices and their characterization are among many of the areas to be pursued.

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ECE Project 5: Evaluation and Development of Analog and Wireless Systems

Faculty Mentor: Michael P. Flynn (mpflynn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Matlab and some knowledge of digital and analog circuit design

Description: This research project will evaluate analog and wireless systems, help develop demonstrations of the analog and wireless systems and design new circuits. Flynn's research group designs analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits for applications as diverse as weather satellites and interfaces to the brain. This project will involve the design of new boards, and the writing of test software as well as software to control instruments. Some integrated circuit design will also be included in the project.

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ECE Project 6: Building and Launching a Nano Spacecraft

Faculty Mentor: Brian Gilchrist (gilchrst@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Calculus III, Physics I and II (mechanics and electromagnetics), basic circuits. Advanced courses in such areas as circuits, physics, embedded controls, or electromagnetics are desired. A demonstrated interest in cross-disciplinary projects is also a plus.

Description: The growing success of nanospacecraft (1–10 kg) over the past decade has generated interest in exploring the potential for even smaller spacecraft, both as stand-alone satellites or as a distributed swarm. Because of advances in integrated circuit and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, the feasibility of miniaturized spacecraft at the levels of fully monolithic semiconductor integrated circuits (10–100 mg) or hybrid integrated circuits (10–100?g) is being seriously investigated. To provide a sense of scale, the new "ultra-small" spacecraft concept is lighter than many modern cellular phones.

We are investigating an approach for ultra-small spacecraft propulsion that appears to scale to the small size needed, is propellantless, and could enable substantially improved communications. The approach uses a short, semi-rigid electrodynamic tether (EDT) for propulsion, which keeps the overall ChipSat mass low and provides enough thrust to overcome drag in low Earth orbit (LEO). The EDT uses the Lorentz force, utilizing a current in a conducting tether in the presence of the Earth's magnetic field to produce a force.

SURE students involved in this project will have an opportunity to build and test the EDT and other satellite subsystems. Students working on this project will also be able to conduct laboratory experiments that will tell us more about how the satellite operates in LEO.

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ECE Project 7: Optical Hall Characterization of Thin Film Semiconductors

Faculty Mentor: Becky Peterson (blpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: EECS 215/216 or EECS 314 or equivalent

Description: In this project, the SURE student will perform Hall measurements on thin film semiconductors under optical illumination. By using light to excite electrons-hole pairs, we can probe electronic states within the bandgap that are not normally accessible during dark measurements. The project will involve electrical testing and data analysis, some coding to expedite testing, and some sample preparation using soldering to form contacts. The student should be comfortable working independently in a test lab. Previous LabView experience and completion of EECS 320 are a plus, but are not mandatory.

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ECE Project 8: Nanoparticle and Sol-gel Fabrication and Characterization of Electronic Materials

Faculty Mentor: Becky Peterson (blpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two semesters of U-M chemistry or equivalent AP credit

Description: The PetersonLab uses nanoparticle and sol-gel inks to fabricate printed electronics. In this SURE project, the student will mix new inks, spin coat them onto glass or silicon substrates, and anneal the samples to form thin films. The student will experiment with UV and ozone film treatment and will study the effect of these treatments on the electronic and optical properties of the films using test equipment in PetersonLab, (MC)2, and Chemistry Dept. Lab. After being trained, the student should be comfortable working independently in a wet chemistry lab and using test equipment. This project could be done by a student majoring or intending to major in MSE, Chem E, or EE.

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ECE Project 9: Teaching and Learning in Engineering

Faculty Mentor: Cindy Finelli (cfinelli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: None

Description: Ample research demonstrates that faculty teaching practices can impact student learning and success in engineering, and Dr. Finelli is engaged in several projects exploring this topic. Depending on student interest and project needs, the research may focus on one of three topics: (1) student resistance to innovative teaching practices and ways for faculty to alleviate it; (2) reasons faculty change their teaching practices and barriers to doing so; or (3) how a flexible classroom space can affect faculty teaching and student learning. Responsibilities for the student include: (a) collecting classroom observation data or survey data, (b) managing data using excel, (c) analyzing data both qualitatively and quantitatively, and (d) communicating outcomes in verbal and written form. The student will work closely with Dr. Finelli and may also be part of a team of researchers from engineering education and other disciplines. Interested students should contact Dr. Finelli (cfinelli@umich.edu) for more information or to apply.

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ECE Project 10: The Investigation of Cancer Stem Cell Development Using Single Cell Microfluidics

Faculty Mentor: Euisik Yoon (esyoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites:

1. Patience and carefulness in doing experiments.
2. Good hand skill for doing experiments.
3. Basic skills in using Excel for data analysis.
4. Basic understanding in statistics such as hypothesis testing.
5. The capability to use MATLAB and write simple scripts for automatic
data analysis.

Description: Cell heterogeneity is a new challenge in cancer therapy. Each cell in the heterogeneous population has its own unique property, and thus responds differently to the same drug, making cancer treatment difficult and complicated. Therefore, it is important to understand the heterogeneity characteristics of cells in drug assays. Still most assays measure the average behavior over large numbers of cells with an underline assumption that all cells are identical, which can lead to incorrect, imprecise results. To understand the behavior of each cell in heterogeneous groups, we should be able to provide high-throughput assays at single cell resolution, enlightening individual properties of each cell rather than the average behavior of the bulk tumor. In this work, we focus on studying the self-renewal and differentiation of cancer stem cells. Using microfluidic technologies, we can isolate and culture an array of 10k single cancer stem cells for several days, and observe their developments on-chip. The proliferation rate and self-renewal/differentiation can be measured using fluorescent imaging.

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ECE Project 11: Security Analysis of Cyber-Physical Control Systems

Faculty Mentor: Stephane Lafortune (stephane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Programming experience in C, C++ and/or Java required

Description: We are developing new algorithms to detect attacks on actuators or sensors in cyber-physical control systems. The student intern will work on implementing and testing these algorithms, either as stand-alone procedures or as part of the UMDES and DESUMA software tools (see: wiki.eecs.umich.edu/desuma). The student will also work on the development of case studies to test these algorithms.

Please contact Prof. Lafortune is you are interested.

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ECE Project 12: Device-to-device sharing for real-time audio/video streaming

Faculty Mentor: Vijay Subramanian (vgsubram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Strong analytical skills. Experience with Android programming. Some experience working in Unix-like environments. Knowledge of probability theory, optimization and information theory.

Description: We are developing novel algorithms to enable easier real-time audio/video streaming on smartphone using device-to-device sharing over the WiFi interface. The project goal is to participate in the development of these algorithms, implement and test them on Android smartphones. We will use network coding and modify the kernel to implement our algorithms. We will also set up a server for generating the real-time stream. This will require two students.

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ECE Project 13: Wavefront Engineering with Spatial Light Modulators

Faculty Mentor: Anthony Grbic (agrbic@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: EECS 230 required. EECS 330 or EECS 334 preferred. Student should have knowledge of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields (plane waves).

Description: The student researcher will use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to steer, focus and shape optical waves. SLMs are devices which allow the modulation of amplitude, phase, and/or polarization of light in space and time. The project will explore the use of SLMs for the generation of holographic images, the tailoring of optical forces for micro-particle trapping, and transmission of light through random media.

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ECE Project 14: Correct-by-construction control implementation on a scaled car

Faculty Mentor: Necmiye Ozay (necmiye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Strong analytical skills and knowledge of linear algebra. Experience with Python and ROS (www.ros.org), or otherwise enough software engineering knowledge that suggests learning other languages, environments, etc. will not be difficult. At least elementary experience of working in Unix-like environments. Familiarity with git is not required but considered useful.

Description: A plethora of driver convenience and safety automation systems are being introduced into production vehicles, such as electronic stability control, adaptive cruise control, lane keeping, and obstacle avoidance. This project will investigate the use of correct-by-construction control protocol synthesis techniques [1] in automotive active safety systems in order to facilitate easy development and deployment of new automated car safety features. In particular, some of the controllers will be implemented on a scaled car in our lab. New control functionality will also be developed. 

[1] P. Nilsson, O. Hussien, Y. Chen, A. Balkan, M. Rungger, A. D. Ames, J. W. Grizzle, N. Ozay, H. Peng, and P. Tabuada, “Preliminary Results on Correct-by-Construction Control Software Synthesis for Adaptive Cruise Control”, IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, 2014.http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~necmiye/n+_cdc14.html

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ECE Project 15: Integration of driving simulators for testing semi-autonomy systems

Faculty Mentor: Necmiye Ozay (necmiye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Strong analytical skills. Proficiency in MATLAB.  At least elementary experience of working in Unix-like environments. Familiarity with git is not required but considered useful.

Description: A guardian protocol is a supervisory controller used in semi-autonomous driving where the human driver has the control of the vehicle most of the time and the guardian corrects the human decisions only when safety necessitates so. In order to reduce the conservativeness of such guardian protocols, they can be combined with algorithms estimating the intention of other drivers. A driver can be inattentive, aggressive or cautious and an autonomous system aware of this intension can perform significantly better. This project will develop a hardware in the loop system using off-the-shelf driving consoles (steering wheel and pedals) and vehicle dynamics software in MATLAB. The overall simulator will be used for collecting driving data and learning different driver behaviors and intentions.

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ECE Project 16: Image processing with artificial neural networks

Faculty Mentor: Wei Lu (wluee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Knowledge of semiconductor devices and digital circuit design

Description: We are developing new circuits for efficient computing and information storage based on emerging devices (i.e. memristors that are resistive devices with an inherent memory). In this project the student will work with a team that builds artificial neural networks using memristor arrays. The goal is to build a hardware system that can extract features from complex inputs including images and videos and other sensory data through a machine learning algorithm, and analyze the data efficiently. Depending on the student’s expertise, the project may involve helping device and circuit measurements, building and programming the test system.

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ECE Project 17: Non-Contact Metering of Wireless Power Transfer

Faculty Mentor: Al Avestruz (avestruz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Basic Circuits (EECS 215), Basic Signals and Systems (EECS 216), Basic Electromagnetics (EECS 230). Familiarity with MATLAB and Circuit Simulation (SPICE). Electronic Circuits (EECS 311) or other advanced circuits classes a plus, but not required. Some experience with PC Board design (e.g. Altium or Eagle) and fabrication a plus. Familiarity with Embedded Systems or Microcontrollers a plus, but not required. Familiarity with 3d printing/prototyping a plus, but not required. Enthusiasm and Personal Energy for Building and Learning definitely a requirement!!

Description: As electrified transportation (automobiles, bicycles, scooters, skateboards, and other rideables) becomes more pervasive, wireless power transfer becomes an interoperable, flexible, and convenient conduit of energy for charging. Different modalities are possible, but equitable methods to meter the energy transfer for the purposes of billing is essential. We will build a wireless power transfer system, investigate different methods to perform metering, build proof-of-principle prototypes, and analyze the concepts and results.

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ECE Project 18: Designing and Building Labs and Demos for Teaching Power Electronics

Faculty Mentor: Al Avestruz (avestruz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Basic Circuits (EECS 215), Basic Signals and Systems (EECS 216), Basic Electromagnetics (EECS 230). Familiarity with Circuit Simulation (SPICE). Power Electronics (EECS 418), Electronic Circuits (EECS 311), or other advanced circuits classes a plus, but not required. Some experience with PC Board design (e.g. Altium or Eagle) and fabrication a plus. Familiarity with Embedded Systems or Microcontrollers a plus, but not required. Familiarity with 3d printing/prototyping a plus, but not required. Enthusiasm and Personal Energy for Building and Learning definitely a requirement!!

Description: We will explore, design, and build power electronics that will be used as demos and labs for future courses. Expect a thoroughly hands-on learning experience in building power electronic systems.

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ECE Project 19: Sparse Kernel Classification

Faculty Mentor: Clay Scott (clayscot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some basic linear algebra (familiarity with norms and inner products) and proficiency in Matlab or a similar scientific computing platform (e.g., octave, python)

Description: Kernel classifiers are nonlinear classifiers that are commonly used to solve complex pattern recognition problems in machine learning. One limitation of these classifiers is scalability, in that they are expensive to evaluate when the amount of training data is large. This project will apply a technique that I have recently developed with one of my graduate students (for solving a related problem) to make kernel classifiers more efficient to evaluate, by introducing sparsity into the classifier representation. The technique has some interesting connections to a kind of clustering problem called the k-center problem that is studied in computer science. The student's role will be to implement a new algorithm and evaluate its performance against baseline methods on some benchmark data sets. If time allows, there are several opportunities for extending the work in different directions.

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ECE Project 20: Computer Vision and TableTop BlocksWord

Faculty Mentor: Jason Corso (jjcorso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: EECS 281 and experience with images, computer vision, robotics (desired but not required)

Description: Student will join a project team working with a tabletop robotic arm and develop an extension of the system to allow for interactive teaching of various blocksworld concepts like rows of blocks, shape of blocks, stacking, etc. Emphasis will be placed on learning of control and semantics from interactive training.

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ECE Project 21: Extremely Tight Focusing for Super High Intensity

Faculty Mentor: John Nees (nees@umich.edu); Associated with Herbert Winful (ECE) and Alec Thomas (NERS)

Prerequisites: Electricity and Magnetism; Programming

Description: Laser light can be focused to make the strongest electromagnetic fields on earth. We are exploring efficient ways to focus light from ultra-short pulsed lasers to the extreme limit of focusing and designing that focus to match the form of radiation from a dipole radiator, one of the fundamental structures used to understand atomic emission and radio broadcast signals. The Center for Ultrafast Optical Science is home to the HERCULES laser which is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as having the highest intensity of record. We intend to enable a focus ten times sharper than the one demonstrated in 2008. and use it to explore electrons and ions in these extreme focused fields and progress toward new tests on the underlying quantum structure of vacuum. The student will participate in hands-on experimentation with very tightly focused light and implementation of strategies for using adaptive optics to optimize focal intensity. Adaptation of published analytical work and implementation of new simulations may also be a part of the work.

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ECE Project 22:  Real-time Hardware/Software Interface for Optoelectrodes

Faculty Mentor: John Seymour (seymourj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Electrical Circuits and Computer Science. Advanced courses in such areas as C++, embedded controls, or electromagnetics are desired. A demonstrated interest in cross-disciplinary projects is also a plus. Experience programming an FPGA using C++ is preferred.

Description: We are looking for a highly motivated undergraduate to advance embedded system technology in the context of brain research. Our current project uses optical light stimulation, high-speed electrical recordings, and custom ICs. Input into the brain must react in real-time based on signal processing results of the brain output. This software and hardware system must achieve low latency and ease of programmability. The system will include embedded software running on an FPGA, analog driver IC, amplifier IC, and a computer with GUI and software platform.

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ECE Project 23:  Distributed MIMO Wireless Communication and Simultaneous Energy Transfer for Ultra-Low Power Energy-Autonomous IoT

Faculty Mentor: Hun Seok Kim (hunseok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Backgrounds in signal processing and/or wireless communication. Familiarity with HDL, FPGA programming or embedded programming is not required but a strong plus.

Description: This program investigates a new ultra-low power (ULP) wireless communication system to bring the ubiquitous and energy-autonomous Internet-of-Things (IoT) vision to reality. Wireless communication is a dominant source of power consumption for the majority of power- and energy-constrained IoT applications. Thus, enabling energy-autonomous wireless connectivity is an urgent and critical task for the highly anticipated concept of Trillions of IoT Devices, where maintaining IoT device batteries on a daily, weekly, or even yearly basis would be impractical and unsustainable. The proposed research program targets orders of magnitude reduction in power and complexity for wireless IoT connectivity solutions to realize battery-less, low cost, low maintenance, disposable, and ubiquitous wireless IoT devices. SURE students involved in this project will have opportunities to model and develop a prototype system for simultaneous RF energy and data transfer in a distributed multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) fashion. 

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ECE Project 24:  Load balancing using random graphs for cloud computing systems

Faculty Mentor: Vijay Subramanian (vgsubram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Strong analytical skills. Experience with Java, Python, or enough software engineering knowledge to comfortably learn and work with other such languages. Some experience working in Unix-like environments. Knowledge of basic graph theory and probability theory.

Description: We are develop novel algorithms for load balancing in cloud computing systems that use random graphs and distributed memory. The project goal is to implement and test these algorithms by developing a web-/Java-/Python-tool that can be easily configured and can run large instances with real-world topologies.

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ECE Project 25:  Fast estimation of Personalized PageRank

Faculty Mentor: Vijay Subramanian (vgsubram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Strong analytical skills. Experience with Java, Python, or enough software engineering knowledge to comfortably learn and work with other such languages. Some experience working in Unix-like environments. Knowledge of basic graph theory and probability theory. EECS 485 would be a big plus.

Description: We are develop novel algorithms for estimating Personalized PageRank using random walks and dynamic programming. The project goal is to implement and test these algorithms in two ways: first, developing a web-/Java-/Python-tool that can be easily configured and can run large instances with real network instances, and second, developing a tool to run these on the Internet.

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ECE Project 26:  Single cell behavioral and genotypic analysis using microfluidics

Faculty Mentor: Yu-Chih Chen (yuchchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites:

1. Patience and carefulness in doing experiments.
2. Good hand skill for doing experiments.
3. Basic skills in using Excel for data analysis.
4. Basic understanding in statistics such as hypothesis testing.
5. The capability to use MATLAB and write simple scripts for automatic
data analysis.

Description: Cell heterogeneity is a new challenge in cancer therapy. Each cell in the heterogeneous population has its own unique property, and thus responds differently to the same drug, making cancer treatment difficult and complicated. Therefore, it is important to understand the heterogeneity characteristics of cells in drug assays. Still most assays measure the average behavior over large numbers of cells with an underline assumption that all cells are identical, which can lead to incorrect, imprecise results. To understand the behavior of each cell in heterogeneous groups, we should be able to provide high-throughput assays at single cell resolution, enlightening individual properties of each cell rather than the average behavior of the bulk tumor. Using microfluidic technologies, we can reliably monitor 10,000 single cells on-chip. In addition to cell behaviors, we are investigating the cellular heterogeneity in gene expression using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Through this integrated approach, we will identify and validate key genes and pathways, providing new therapeutic targets to eliminate cancer cells and ultimately leading to improved outcomes for patients.

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ECE Project 27:  Data Storage for High-speed Brain Research

Faculty Mentor: Euisik Yoon (esyoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Electrical Circuits and Optics. Advanced courses in such areas as embedded controls, or electromagnetics are desired. A demonstrated interest in cross-disciplinary projects is also a plus.

Description: We are looking for a highly motivated undergraduate to advance electrical circuit technology in the context of brain research. Our current project uses optical light stimulation, high-speed electrical recordings, and custom ICs. In the neuroscience experiments, the amount of data streaming out of a rodent brain is too much to transfer real-time and hence we need to write most of the information to SRAM in a small rodent backpack assembly. This system needs to be developed using commercially available parts and protocols.

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ECE Project 28: Nanowire deep ultraviolet light-emitting devices

Faculty Mentor: Zetian Mi (ztmi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in electronics, optics and materials science. Strong experimental experience is preferred.

Description: Ultraviolet light sources are crucial for applications ranging from water purification to biochemical sensing. To date, however, the realization of high efficiency ultraviolet semiconductor optoelectronic devices including light-emitting diodes and lasers remains a challenge. This project is related to the development of nanostructures such as nanowires to achieve such solid-state light sources. The student will work with graduate student mentors on the epitaxial growth, fabrication, characterization and testing of these devices; and is expected to deliver a detailed report on the current status of deep ultraviolet light sources and the progress that is made.

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ECE Project 29:  Artificial photosynthesis and solar fuels generation

Faculty Mentor: Zetian Mi (ztmi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering or Materials Science

Description: Artificial photosynthesis and solar fuels production has emerged one of the most promising approaches to address the energy and environment challenge we face today. This project involves the design of nanowire photocatalyst/photoelectrode and extensive photoelectrochemical and solar water splitting studies. This project will help develop interdisciplinary knowledge and skill sets in electrical engineering, materials science and chemistry. The student will have a graduate student mentor to prepare nanowires electrode, conduct measurement, and improve the device performance.

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ECE Project 30:  Full-color nanowire lasers for lighting, display and imaging applications

Faculty Mentor: Zetian Mi (ztmi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Background in Optics and Materials Science

Description: High efficiency multi-color lasers monolithically integrated on a single chip are highly desired for future smart lighting, full-color display, and imaging applications. With the use of selective area epitaxy, the emission wavelengths of InGaN/GaN nanowires can be tuned across nearly the entire visible spectrum on a single chip by varying nanowire size and compositions. This project involves the design and optical and structural characterization of nanowire photonic crystal structures and the demonstration of surface-emitting lasers. The student will work with a graduate student mentor on optical modeling and device characterization.

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ECE Project 31:  Implementing control synthesis algorithms in TuLiP toolbox

Faculty Mentor: Necmiye Ozay (necmiye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Strong analytical and programming skills. Experience with git. Basic knowledge of code unit testing, discrete math, graph theory and optimization would be useful.

Description: Correct-by-construction controller synthesis is the use of a computer to automatically construct a controller such that when implemented, the resulting closed-loop system satisfies some a priori given specification. Such synthesis relies on algorithms that typically scale badly with system dimension: they suffer from the curse of dimensionality. The primary goal of this project is to implement a recently developed correct-by-construction method and integrate it into the Python toolbox TuLiP (http://tulip-control.sourceforge.net).  The method alleviates the curse of dimensionality by abstracting the state space and doing incremental abstraction refinement only in “promising” areas, thus potentially eliminating the need to analyze large swaths of the state space. The secondary (stretch) goal is to apply the algorithms in a realistic case study on building HVAC control to showcase the applicability of the method.

Further reading: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7040368/?arnumber=7040368

Key concepts: Python development (previous experience preferred), code unit testing, algorithms, git, system abstraction, linear temporal logic

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ECE Project 32: Texture Classification with Texture Similarity Metric

Faculty Mentor: David Neuhoff (neuhoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: EECS 216, EECS 301, familiarity with Matlab (EECS 351 or 451 would also be useful)

Description: This is an image processing project in which the student will use newly invented texture similarity metrics to develop systems that can identify different types of objects. For example, one goal could be to develop a system that identifies the species of a tree from a picture of its bark, along with pictures of the bark of previously identified trees. Tuning and modifying the metric will be needed.

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ECE Project (Listed under Material Science #3): Gallium Nanoparticle Plasmonics

Faculty Mentor: Rachel Goldman (rsgold@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A strong interest in experimental science and/or engineering is required. Completion of Introductory Chemistry and Physics Labs is preferred but not required.

Description: Metal nanoparticle arrays often exhibit collective electron oscillations (plasmon resonances) which are promising for enhanced light emission, efficient solar energy harvesting, ultra-sensitive biosensing, and optical cloaking.  To date, materials research and device fabrication have focused nearly exclusively on silver and gold nanoparticle dispersions in two dimensions; these arrays exhibit plasmon resonances limited to visible wavelengths.  Recently, we demonstrated a novel method to assemble high-quality gallium nanoparticle arrays with surface plasmon resonances tunable from the infrared to visible wavelength range.  In this summer project, we explore the influence of gallium nanoparticle arrays on the properties of compound semiconductor solar cells, using a combination of electromagnetic simulations, molecular-beam epitaxy, atomic-force microscopy, and optical spectroscopy.

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