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Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

Prof. Jenna Wiens group had two papers highlighted in a session on the top 10 most influential papers in healthcare epidemiology and infection control at Infectious Disease Week (IDWeek 2018). The papers were selected for their impact, the number of times they were cited in the preceding two years, and their potential effect on future research and technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

Using machine learning to decode the unpredictable world of human emotion might seem like an unusual choice. But in the ambiguity of human expression, U-M computer science and engineering associate professor Emily Mower Provost has discovered a rich trove of data waiting to be analyzed. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Making software failures a little less catastrophic

Prof. Baris Kasikci presented a new technique called REPT REverse debugging with Processor Trace. In the paper REPT: Reverse Debugging of Failures in Deployed Software, Kasikci and collaborators propose a method to recreate the failing program execution to better diagnose the problem at hand. This technique is now deployed on Windows systems and the Windows Debugger platform. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Software Systems  

Todd Austin recognized for outstanding achievements

Prof. Todd Austin has been recognized with the University of Michigans Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, which honors senior faculty who have consistently demonstrated outstanding achievements in the areas of scholarly research or creative endeavors, teaching and mentoring of students and junior faculty, and service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Gaining a deeper understanding of how personal values are expressed in text

Content analysis of large collections of text is often a useful first step in understanding what people are talking or writing about. PhD student Steve Wilson, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Master student Yiting Shen have proposed a new method of performing these analyses in their paper, Building and Validating Hierarchical Lexicons with a Case Study on Personal Values. The researchers earned a Best Paper Award at the 2018 International Conference on Social Informatics (SocInfo) for their work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

The Tinder for Markets Is Run on Crypto

In this article, Lynn A. Conway Professor of CSE Michael Wellman comments on the hedge fund Numerai and its market, which crowdsources data scientists to make predictions and is based on the cryptocurrency Numeraire. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Tyche: A new permission model to defend against smart home hacks

Prof. Atul Prakash, CSE PhD student Kevin Eykholt, and CSE alumni Amir Rahmati and Earlence Fernandes have proposed Tyche, a safer app permissions system for smart homes and the Internet of Things. Their paper on this project, Tyche: A Risk-Based Permission Model for Smart Homes, received a Best Paper Award at the IEEE Cybersecurity Development Conference. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Systems  Prakash, Atul  

Michigan CS makes waves at Tapia 2018

Students in CSE got the chance to network and celebrate diversity in computing at the 2018 Richard Tapia Conference, which took place in Orlando, Florida on September 19 - 22. This years conference theme was Diversity: Roots of Innovation, acknowledging the historical role of diversity in STEM innovation and its essential role in innovating the future. CSE staff attended the conferences exhibition hall as an event sponsor, and were able to connect with a number of students regarding programs of study in computer science and engineering at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Jenkins, Chad  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Undergraduate Students  

A champion for women in computer science

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has been selected as the Center for the Education of Women (CEW+)s 2018 Carol Hollenshead Award recipient for her work to increase the pipeline and retention of women in engineering and computer science. Mihalcea has dedicated substantial effort to developing programs that introduce more women to the world of computing and encourage them to pursue graduate studies and research careers in the field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Norman Scott (1918-2018): In Memoriam

Norman Scott, professor emeritus of EECS, passed away on August 20, 2018 at the age of 100. Prof. Scott was recognized not only within U-M, but also nationally, for his work on digital computer logic and design. [Full Story]

2001: A Space Odyssey: From science fiction to science fact

Three leading researchers, including Profs. Rada Mihalcea and Ben Kuipers, explored the question of science and science fiction in a panel discussion Friday, Sept. 21 part of Michigan Engineerings celebration of the 50th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The panel preceded a screening of the film with live orchestral and choral accompaniment. Michigan Engineering and the University Musical Society co-sponsored the screening, which was one of only three such live performances across the country this year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

May Mobility puts autonomous shuttles on the streets of Columbus, Ohio

May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle company founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is training its vehicles to navigate the streets of Columbus. May has already launched their vehicles in Detroit, completed over 10,000 trips, and this is the second full implementation of the tech. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Self-driving pods are slow, boring, and weird-looking and thats a good thing

May Mobility, co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, celebrated its 10,000th trip in Detroit, where its fleet of autonomous, six-seater shuttles offer rides to Quicken Loans employees for free along a one-mile loop. It only took the Ann Arbor-based startup 75 days to hit that mark, a sign that slow and steady can sometimes win the self-driving race. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Michigan startup May Mobility to deploy self-driving shuttles in Columbus, Ohio

Michigan startup May Mobility, cofounded by Prof. Edwin Olson, has announced that it has been chosen by the state of Ohio to begin testing a self-driving shuttle service on the streets of Columbus. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Women Killin it in STEM Fields

Prof. Rada Mihalcea was featured as one of 10 making incredible scientific discoveries in STEM fields from around the world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

What does Duo Security's sale mean for the Ann Arbor area and its tech industry?

This article summarizes the viewpoints of a number of people in Ann Arbor's tech scene -- including Prof. Jason Mars -- on the ramifications of the recent purchase of Ann Arbor unicorn Duo Security by Cisco. Duo was founded by CSE alumni Dug Song and Jon Oberheide; Mars is the co-founder of Ann Arbor AI startup Clinc. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Introductory EECS course designed for women, those without prior experience embarks on first semester

This article provides an early glimpse of student experiences in EECS 198: Discover Computer Science. Taught by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and doctoral student Laura Wendlandt, the course provides a supportive atmosphere for students with more curiosity than experience in CS. [Full Story]

Hackers can spy on your computer screen just by listening to your webcam's microphone, experts warn

Prof. Daniel Genkin and a team of researchers discovered how hackers can spy on remote computers. LCD displays emit high-frequency sounds that can be recorded by a microphone, including from webcam, smartphone or smart speaker up to 30 ft away. These recordings are then fed into a machine learning algorithm and analyzed to generate an estimation of what's onscreen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  

Researchers find way to spy on remote screensthrough the webcam mic

Prof. Daniel Genkin and collaborators have investigated a potential new avenue of remote surveillance that they have dubbed "Synesthesia": a side-channel attack that can reveal the contents of a remote screen, providing access to potentially sensitive information based solely on "content-dependent acoustic leakage from LCD screens." All that is needed is audio picked up by webcam microphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  

To cripple AI, hackers are turning data against itself

Data has powered the artificial intelligence revolution. Now security experts are uncovering worrying ways in which AIs can be hacked to go rogue. PhD student Kevin Eykholt talks to Wired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Prakash, Atul  

Kickstarting the first year for women in computer science

The third annual CS KickStart gave 22 incoming women in CS a hands-on look at the skills and careers on offer in the world of computing. CS KickStart is a free week-long summer program for incoming first-year students that aims to improve the enrollment and persistence of women in CS and give women a voice in shaping the future through technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brehob, Mark  Das, Reetuparna  Diversity and Outreach  Ensafi, Roya  Laird, John  Undergraduate Students  

Cuba's "Sonic Attack" on the U.S. Embassy Could Have Been Merely Sounds Emitted by a Listening Device

A Penn bioengineer disputes a recent New York Times report suggesting microwaves accounted for what occurred at the U.S. embassy in Havana, agrees with hypothesis by Prof. Kevin Fu that the cause could have been ultrasound spy tech.

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Detecting Huntington's disease with an algorithm that analyzes speech

In an advance that could one day provide new insight into the progression of neurological diseases like Huntington's disease, Alzheimers and Parkinson's, researchers including Prof. Emily Mower Provost have demonstrated the first automated system that uses speech analysis to detect Huntington's disease. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Detecting Fake News With The Help Of An Algorithm

Prof. Rada Mihalcea recently developed an algorithm that can identify fake news stories better than humans. The algorithm uses linguistic clues to differentiate between factual and inaccurate stories. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Faster, cheaper gene sequencing to make healthcare more precise

Arun Subramaniyan, CSE PhD student, received a U-M 2018 Precision Health Scholars Award for his project, Hardware-accelerated systems for next-generation sequencing analysis. Subramaniyan is working with his advisor Prof. Reetuparna Das to make genome sequencing as affordable as a routine medical test with highly efficient computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Graduate Students  Health and Safety  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Fall 2018: Artificial Intelligence Application in Electrical Engineering

Course No.: EECS 598-014
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jared Chaar
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
The core concepts of AI and their applicability in Electrical Engineering are covered. Topics include search techniques and heuristics, logic and reasoning, knowledge representation, advanced planning, decisionmaking under uncertainty, andmachine learning. Using a number of these techniques and open source (Python) AI APIs, students will work in teams to implement the control components of an electric system.
[More Info]

Outstanding Postdoctoral Fellow Award for smart conversation tools

Jonathan Kummerfeld, postdoctoral fellow in CSE, has been recognized by U-M for his excellence in research, teaching, mentoring, service, and leadership. The Outstanding Postdoctoral Fellowship Award is given to 10 fellows each year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Language and Text Processing  

Algorithm outperforms humans at spotting fake news

An artificial intelligence system that can tell the difference between real and fake news often with better success rates than its human counterparts has been developed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea. Such a system may hep social media platforms, search engines, and news aggregators filter out articles meant to misinform. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Alumnus Rick Mario Riolo: In Memoriam

Rick Riolo, Research Professor Emeritus of the University of Michigan Center for the Study of Complex Systems, has been one of the most visible and influential researchers, mentors, and instructors in the interdisciplinary field of complex adaptive systems for four decades. The author of more than 80 papers, Riolo made substantial methodological and applied contributions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Alumnus Garlin Gilchrist named as running mate for Michigan Governor race

Garlin Gilchrist (BSE CE CS 2005) was named as running mate by Gretchen Whitmer in her bid for the Michigan Governorship. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

CSE welcomes 9 new faculty

Models of human behavior, scene understanding, cryptography, convolutional neural networks, IoT sensors and systems, and a commitment to innovating in the practice of education. With nine new faculty hires in 2018, Michigan is expanding and strengthening the scope of its research activities in computer science and engineering while simultaneously broadening participation in the field through a focus on innovation and inclusiveness in education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Systems  Lab-Theory of Computation  

Google award to introduce women to computer science research

Prof. Rada Mihalcea and PhD student Laura Wendlandt have been awarded a Google grant to develop a workshop that will give undergraduate women in computer science valuable hands-on research experience. The workshop theyve proposed, spread over an entire semester, would engage around 70 undergraduate women in computing research through a series of hands-on activities and mentorship from research faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Kids at hacking conference show how easily US elections could be sabotaged

In this article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on the problems that continue to exist with electronic voting, and why paper ballots should be used. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Fall 2018: Topics in Hardware Security

Course No.: EECS 598-012
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Daniel Genkin
Prerequisites: Prior experience in low level programming

Course Description:
The security of a system is only as good as its weakest link. Even if a system's software is perfectly secure, the complex interactions between the system's hardware and the physical world have not been properly understood. Side-channel attacks exploit unintentional, abstraction-defying leakage from physical devices (such as the device's power consumption, electromagnetic radiation or execution timing variations) to recover otherwise-unavailable secret information. In this class, we shall review recent papers in the area of side channel attacks and their mitigations.

Specific topics include (but not limited to):1. Physical side channel attacks such as power and electromagnetic analysis2. Microarchitectural attacks such as cache attacks, and Rowhammer3. Speculative execution attacks: Spectre, Meltdown and Foreshadow4. Side channel mitigations and countermeasures
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Engineering Interactive Systems for HCI

Course No.: EECS 598-013
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Alanson Sample
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
Recent advances in the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Ubiquitous Computing have focused on creating innovative devices and methods for user interaction, new ways of displaying information, and novel methods of sensing and understanding the state of users and their environment. This course will focus on both, reviewing the state-of-the-art of interactive systems and the technologies that enable them, as well as teaching the skills necessary to actually build these research prototypes.

Classroom instruction will focus on a review of current research topics and literature in technical HCI areas including interactive technologies, augmented reality, haptics, wearables, shape-changing interfaces, and more. Homework assignments will take the form of mini-projects designed to build hands-on skills in the use of laser cutters, 3D printers, sensing and signal acquisition circuits, embedded systems, PCB design, and machine learning for event and activity recognition. The class will culminate in a final project where teams of students will pitch, build, and demo a self-defined project using the skills developed in this course. In lieu of purchasing a course textbook, students will be expected to buy a lab kit.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Election Cybersecurity

Course No.: EECS 498-009
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: J. Alex Halderman
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
Elections, the foundation of democracy, are increasingly subject to electronic attacks. Manipulation of social media, hacks against campaigns, and vulnerabilities in voting equipment create unprecedented risks.

This new course will examine the past, present, and future of election security, informed by perspectives at the intersection of computer science, law and public policy, politics, and international affairs.

We will study how elections can be attached and work to help defend them, using a broad range of technical and public policy tools.
[More Info]

Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human

An algorithm-based system that identifies telltale linguistic cues in fake news stories could provide news aggregator and social media sites like Google News with a new weapon in the fight against misinformation. Led by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, the researchers have demonstrated that its comparable to and sometimes better than humans at correctly identifying fake news stories. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Communications  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Making online communication smarter with Trove Video

Trove is an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup built on the vision of improving communication using artificial intelligence. Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki are collaborating with the company to develop novel methods and tools that will help make intelligent online communication smarter. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Communications  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lasecki, Walter  

Two-wheeled teacher

Levi Weintraub (BSE CS 06) has lived on two wheels for close to two years now, putting his incredibly accomplished tech career on hold for an epic trans-African journey thats stoking his passion for travel and educating a cohort of aspiring African tech professionals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Education  

Intel's SGX blown wide open by, you guessed it, a speculative execution attack

ARS Technica reports on the security work done by Michigan CSE researchers and their collaborators on a flaw in what was supposed to be a secure enclave in Intel chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Spectre-Like Flaw Undermines Intel Processors' Most Secure Element

Wired reports on the security work done by Michigan CSE researchers and their collaborators on a flaw in what was supposed to be a secure enclave in Intel chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

A newly discovered processor vulnerability could potentially put secure information at risk in any Intel-based PC manufactured since 2008. It could affect users who rely on a digital lockbox feature known as Intel Software Guard Extensions, or SGX, as well as those who utilize common cloud-based services. CSE researchers contributed to the discovery of the security hole, called Foreshadow. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Hackers are out to jeopardize your vote

Cyberattacks on the 2016 US election caused states to bolster the defenses of their voting systems. Prof. J Alex Halderman explains why this hasn't been enough in this Q&A piece. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Is Blockchain Technology the Future of Voting?

West Virginia is experimenting with voting via a blockchain network using smartphones. Prof. J. Alex Halderman cautions that such an approach is not yet truly viable, and that mobile voting using blockchain doesn't address core security problems that are unique to mobile voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Heartland Tech Weekly: How Duo Security built a $2.35 billion company in Ann Arbor

Venture Beat reports on Ann Arbor unicorn Duo Security's sale to Cisco. It quotes company cofounder Dug Son (CS BS 1997) on why he and cofounder Jon Oberheide (CSE PhD 2011) made the sale, the future for Duo, and the impact expected for the Ann Arbor tech scene. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Sounding the Alarm on the Dangers of Electronic Voting

Prof. J. Alex Halderman explains the dangers inherent with electronic voting machines, especially those without paperbackup, in the BloombergTV interview with Emily Chang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Michigan Data Science Team wrangles big data

The Michigan Data Science Team brings together students from many fields to get their hands dirty with real data science problems and tools. The team gives members a place to learn from experts, form groups to tackle data science challenges, and do research that matches their interests. In the 2018-19 school year, Computer Science and Data Science undergrad Wesley Tian will be leading the organization as president, with plans to focus the groups activities and provide a better learning experience for new members. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Graduate Students  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Cisco is buying Duo Security for $2.35B in cash

Cisco today announced its intention to buy Ann Arbor, MI-based security firm, Duo Security. Under the terms of the agreement, Cisco is paying $2.35 billion in cash and assumed equity awards for Duo. Duo Security was founded in 2010 by Dug Song (BS CS ) and Jonathan Oberheide (BS, MS, PhD CSE , , ) and went on to raise $121.M through several rounds of funding. The company has 700 employees with offices throughout the United States and in London, though the company has remained headquartered in Ann Arbor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  

Voting systems in Wisconsin, a key swing state, can be hacked, security experts warn

This article at WisconsinWatch.org reports in detail on potential vulnerabilities in Wisconsin's voting system, including risks from Russian hacking. It reviews the response of Wisconsin politicians to this prospect as well as the viewpoints of computer scientists. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, an expert in computer, network, and election security, is highlighted in the story. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

People are bad at spotting fake news. Can computer programs do better?

This article is a survey of the many projects dedicated to using computing power to identify fake news. It includes a description of work being done at Michigan by Veronica Perez-Rosas and her colleagues on the use of language in the posts regarding fake news. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Perez-Rosas, Veronica  

All CSE News for 2018